ACHD Featured Articles of March 2017

ACHD Featured Reviews of March 2017 Publications

 

Contraceptive Practices of Women with Complex Congenital Heart Disease.

Miner PD, Canobbio MM, Pearson DD, Schlater M, Balon Y, Junge KJ, Bhatt A, Barber D, Nickolaus MJ, Kovacs AH, Moons P, Shaw K, Fernandes SM.

Am J Cardiol. 2017 Mar 15;119(6):911-915. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2016.11.047. Epub 2016 Dec 18.

PMID:28087052

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Select item 28318514 142.

Take Home Points:

 

  • A quarter of patients with ACHD had unplanned pregnancies.
  • Contraception counseling provided by the ACHD service only occurred in 43%.
  • Many patients with complex CHD who are at high risk for thromboembolic events are still using estrogen-based oral contraception with a documented risk of events of 4% in the total cohort (28% in the Fontan cohort).


Blanche CupidoCommentary from Dr Blanche Cupido (Cape Town, South Africa), section editor of ACHD Journal Watch:
Women with complex congenital heart disease (CHD) have a greater risk of adverse complications during pregnancy. Contraception and pre-conception counseling plays an important role in trying to reduce the risk of unplanned pregnancies. This study aimed to describe contraceptive practices of women with CHD (aged 18 years or older). It was a cross-sectional survey conducted from 2011-2014 in 9 ACHD centers across North America. The median age of the 505 women who participated was 33 years.  80% of patients were still menstruating.

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Most patients used barrier methods (87%), with oral contraception (OC) being the next most utilized form of contraception (84%). The use of emergency contraception was 19% and 16% had been sterilized. More patients in the complex CHD group had sterilization (22% vs 12%, p=0.047).

 

The rates of progesterone-only OC use was greater in those patients with more complex CHD (19%, 27% and 39% respectively in those with simple, moderate and complex CHD, p=0.034). Despite current guideline recommendations for the use of progesterone only-based contraception in those patients at high risk of thromboembolic events (mechanical prosthetic valves, cyanotic patients, Fontan circulation patients), many patients with complex CHD (>60%) are receiving an estrogen containing contraception pill. Four percent of the total cohort on OC experienced a thrombotic event. In a high-risk subset of Fontan patients (n=31), 28% had an event.  The prevalence of thrombotic events in those patients with previous OC use was 39% compared to 17% in those with no previous OC use.

 

Although 84% of the total cohort had received some sort of contraception counseling, only 43% received it from their ACHD provider. Patients with greater complexity CHD were more likely to receive counseling (56 vs 45%, p=0.036). Regardless of the complexity of their underlying disease, 25% of patients had an unplanned pregnancy.

 

Mortality Risk Stratification in Fontan Patients Who Underwent Heart Transplantation.

Berg CJ, Bauer BS, Hageman A, Aboulhosn JA, Reardon LC.

Am J Cardiol. 2017 May 15;119(10):1675-1679. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2017.02.005. Epub 2017 Mar 1.

PMID:  28341356

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Take Home Point: 

  • The authors propose a risk score to help predict mortality in Fontan patients undergoing cardiac transplantation. This score includes: Age < 18 at time of transplant, Fontan-transplantation interval < 10 years, MELD XI score ≥ 19, systemic ventricle ejection fraction < 20%, moderate to severe atrioventricular valve regurgitation, and pre-transplant advanced mechanical support.

 

jokhadar-maanCommentary from Dr. Maan Jokhadar (Atlanta), section editor of ACHD Journal Watch:   The Fontan procedure and its various modifications have improved the survival of single ventricle patients.  However, Fontan circulation failure and decompensation is a common consequence and referral for cardiac transplantation is increasing in frequency though post-transplant outcomes appear to be worse in this population.  Predicting outcomes in Fontan patients referred for cardiac transplantation would be helpful in candidate selection and potentially in organ allocation.

 

Dr. Berg and colleagues from University of California in Los Angeles conducted a single center, retrospective cohort analysis of all single ventricle patients who underwent cardiac transplantation for failing Fontan between 1991 and 2014.  There was a total of 36 patients with a mean age of 21 years (7 to 48) and a mean follow-up of about 3.5 years.  Two thirds had systemic left ventricle and 2 patients had concurrent heart and liver transplantation. There were a total of 17 deaths during the follow-up that included 8 who died before hospital discharge from heart transplant, 2 with allograft failure, 2 with pulmonary hemorrhage, 2 with septic shock, 1 with superior vena cava syndrome, and 1 with coagulopathy/hemorrhage.  Late causes of death included 3 patients with cardiac allograft vasculopathy, 2 with rejection, and 1 with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease.  There were 3 patients with unknown cause of death.

 

The patients with the highest risk of death or those under the age of 18 (HR 3.88) with less than a 10-year interval between the Fontan operation and heart transplant (HR 4.38).  Also, transplantation prior to 2004 was associated with increased mortality (HR 4.18).  Interestingly, the number of prior heart surgeries and systemic left ventricle was not associated with increased mortality.  Univariate analysis between preoperative factors and postoperative mortality showed a significant association between severely reduced systemic ventricle ejection fraction < 20% (HR 3.40), moderate to severe atrioventricular valve regurgitation (HR 8.12), advanced mechanical support (renal replacement therapy (HR 72.29) and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (HR 6.25)), as well as MELD XI score ≥ 19 (HR 4.91).  Fontan pressure > 16.5 mmHg was actually associated with reduced perioperative mortality.  Also of note, elevated trans-pulmonary gradient, chronic renal insufficiency, cirrhosis, and ascites, were not associated with increased postoperative mortality.

 

Though protein-losing enteropathy is generally associated with increased morbidity and mortality, this was not a predictor of post-transplant mortality in this study, which is consistent with prior reports.  It is interesting to note that protein-losing enteropathy is associated with lower bilirubin due to gastrointestinal loss of proteins that include albumin-bound bilirubin.  Thus, lower bilirubin levels result and a lower MELD XI score.

 

Based on these results, the investigators created a scoring system to help predict post-transplant mortality:

 

Age < 18 at time of transplant (1 point)
Fontan-transplantation interval < 10 years (2 points)
MELD XI score ≥ 19 (2 points)
Systemic ventricle ejection fraction < 20% (1 point)
Moderate to severe atrioventricular valve regurgitation (3 points)
Pre-transplant advanced mechanical support (3 points)

Maximum total score 12 points

 

In this study, the scoring system performance was as follows:

 

Score 0-1: No mortality during follow-up period.
Scores of 2-5 points: 50% mortality during follow-up period.
Scores greater than 5: 88% mortality during follow-up period.

 

This scoring system needs prospective validation before it is adopted as part of the evaluation of Fontan patients being considered for transplantation. This study could help answer the question of which Fontan patients are too sick for transplant. However, it should be noted that perioperative and postoperative mortality differs widely from one center to another (4% to 35% with an average of about 22%). The perioperative mortality after heart transplant in this study was about 22%. Transplanted organs are a scarce resource and patients who are listed for transplantation should have a realistic chance of benefit, while reducing morbidity and mortality. Clearly, sicker patients have worse outcomes and are less likely to benefit from cardiac transplantation.

 

Though this study may help answer the question of which Fontan patients may be too sick for transplant, this study does not answer the question of which Fontan patients should be listed and when. There is a fine line between too well for transplant and too sick for transplant, which appears to be more elusive in Fontan patients. Fontan failure patients can remain stable with medical therapy for years without transplant while some have precipitous decline that is often difficult to predict.  Further study is needed to help identify the Fontan patients who are at highest risk of 12 to 24-month mortality and identifying these patients may help refine specific and appropriate transplant criteria, listing status, and organ allocation for this precious gift of life.

 

Adult Congenital Cardiac Care.

Kogon BE, Miller K, Miller P, Alsoufi B, Rosenblum JM.

World J Pediatr Congenit Heart Surg. 2017 Mar;8(2):242-247. doi: 10.1177/2150135117690126.

PMID: 28329454

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Take Home Points:

 The Adult Congenital Heart Association has created an online clinic directory of ACHD centers.

  • From 2006 to 2015, there has been an increase in programme access and availability over time in the USA, with more programmes in more states.
  • Access to diagnostic and therapeutic services, as well as ancillary services have expanded in these ACHD programmes.

 

 

Commentary from Dr Leong Ming Chern (Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia), Section editor of ACHD Journal Watch:  The Adult Congenital Heart Association (ACHA) has created an online clinic directory of ACHD centers. This data is self-reported and it incorporates all self-identified ACHD programmes in and out of USA. The authors analyzed the directory in 2006 and 2015, evaluating the growth of the directory in the USA as a whole and the growth of these programme individually.

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By the end of 2015, compared to 2006, there were more ACHD programmes reporting to the directory in more states (107 programmes across 42 states vs 57 programmes across 33 states), with higher overall clinical volume (591 vs 164 half-day clinics per week, 96611 vs 34446 patient visits). On average, each programme was busier (5 vs 2 half-day clinics per week per programme). Over the time, the number of reported annual operations performed nearly doubled (4346 operations by 210 surgeons vs 2461 operations by 125 surgeons). There was an increase in per-programme volume for ACHD specialized clinics.

achd media 3

 

Access to diagnostic and therapeutic services such as echocardiography, diagnostic and interventional electrophysiology, cardiac computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance were reportedly available in 96%-100% of programmes. Other ancillary services such as high-risk obstetrics, pulmonary hypertension, genetic counseling etc., were reported available in 77%-96% of programmes.

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In view of the increased demand and workload in these programmes, efforts have been made to verify the information reported in the clinic directory, streamlining the training of cardiologists and surgeons in the care of patients with ACHD and systemic data collection and quality assessment of certain diagnostic and therapeutic services.

In conclusion, between 2006 and 2015, the clinical directory and the individual programmes have grown in the USA.

 

Am J Cardiol. 2017 Mar 1;119(5):785-789. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2016.11.021. Epub 2016 Dec 2.

Chronobiology of Acute Aortic Dissection in the Marfan Syndrome (from the National Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions and the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection).

Siddiqi HK1Luminais SN2Montgomery D3Bossone E4Dietz H5Evangelista A6Isselbacher E7LeMaire S8Manfredini R9Milewicz D10Nienaber CA11Roman M12Sechtem U13Silberbach M14Eagle KA3Pyeritz RE2GenTAC and IRAD investigators.

Take Home Points:

 Marfan Syndrome is associated with acute aortic dissection (AAD).

  • AAD is more likely in winter/spring season (November to April) compared to other half of the year.
  • It is more likely to occur during daytime hours (6am to 6pm) with men more likely to follow such temporal variation than women.

 

Commentary from Dr Leong Ming Chern (Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia), Section editor of ACHD Journal Watch:   Marfan syndrome is associated with acute aortic dissection (AAD). The authors analyzed 2 large registries i.e. the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection (IRAD) and the Genetically Trigger Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions (GenTAC) registries, to extract data on 257 patients with Marfan Syndrome who had suffered from an acute aortic dissection from 1980 to 2012, with the aim to study the possible trends in the chronobiology of AAD in this group of patients.

 

Mean age at time of AAD was 38 years and 156 (61%) of subjects were men. 167 (65%) of patients suffered a type A dissection. AAD was more likely in winter/spring season (November to April) than other half of the year (57% vs 43%, p=0.05). No effect of gender, type of dissection or hypertension on the seasonal distribution of AAD.

 

Dissections were significantly more likely to occur during daytime hours, with 66% of dissection occurring from 6am to 6pm (p=0.001). Men were more likely to dissect during the daytime hours than women (74%vs51%, p=0.01).

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Various studies have described higher incidence of acute coronary events in the mornings and its seasonal pattern, although the exact pathophysiology is not clearly understood. Findings in this study supports the association between AAD in Marfan Syndrome and its temporal and seasonal variation, which can be used to aid treatment and resource planning as well as risk factor modification.

 

 

Outcome of adults with Eisenmenger syndrome treated with drugs specific to pulmonary arterial hypertension: A French multicentre study.

Hascoet S, Fournier E, Jaïs X, Le Gloan L, Dauphin C, Houeijeh A, Godart F, Iriart X, Richard A, Radojevic J, Amedro P, Bosser G, Souletie N, Bernard Y, Moceri P, Bouvaist H, Mauran P, Barre E, Basquin A, Karsenty C, Bonnet D, Iserin L, Sitbon O, Petit J, Fadel E, Humbert M, Ladouceur M.

Arch Cardiovasc Dis. 2017 Mar 9. pii: S1875-2136(17)30045-1. doi: 10.1016/j.acvd.2017.01.006. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 28286190

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Select item 28281093 174.

 Take Home Points:

 In tertiary care centers in France, over 80% of patients with Eisenmenger syndrome (ES) are on at least one PAH-specific drug, ranging between 41.7% to 100% at various centers

  • ES Patients who take either 1 or 2 PAH-specific drugs appear to have better clinical outcomes than patients on no PAH-specific drugs or who are on triple therapy
  • Although the onset of PAH in pretricuspid defects tends to occur later than for posttricuspid defects, this study indicates that prognosis of patients with PAH due to pretricuspid defects is fairly poor
  • In patients with ES, use of PAH-specific drugs appears to lower risk of transplantation and mortality; however, drug therapy is still palliative, and overall outcome of ES is still poor.

 

Kay_William_MD.16.CVaCommentary from Dr. W. Aaron Kay (Indianapolis), section editor of ACHD Journal Watch:  This study very nicely demonstrates the “real world” treatment of Eisenmenger syndrome (ES) at a variety of tertiary care centers in France.  Overall, 340 patients from 20 separate centers were included.  Patients were analyzed according to defect type (pretricuspid versus posttricuspid shunt), age at time of analysis, and duration of time from PAH diagnosis to time of analysis.  The overall proportion of ES patients on PAH-specific drugs was 80.9%, varying between ~40% and 100% between centers.  The percentage of patients on PAH-specific drugs was much high for those with pretricuspid shunts than posttricuspid shunts.  In this study, ES was defined as PAH (determined by invasive hemodynamics) including a mean pulmonary artery pressure of > 25 mmHg, a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure of < 15 mmHg, and a pulmonary vascular resistance > 3 Woods units, in the presence of a large, non-restrictive intracardiac and/or extracardiac shunt.  Other types of PAH associated with ACHD were not included (i.e. patients with persistent Blalock-Taussig shunts or complex pulmonary artery anatomy).

Endpoints for the study included clinical outcomes, with the primary outcomes being death or the need for lung or heart-lung transplantation.  Other clinical events recorded included heart failure, severe infection, arrhythmias, stroke, hemoptysis and other bleeding events.  Events were analyzed with Kaplan-Meier curves based on two models; one model using patient age as the time scale, and a second model using time since PAH diagnosis the time scale.  Genetic syndrome was also included as a variable, with trisomy 21 by far being the most common syndrome.  Clinical data were available for the clear majority of patients, with 93.8% available at the time of initiation of PAH-specific drug therapy.  Median follow-up after drug initiation was 5.5 years (range 3.0-9.1 years).  During follow-up, 19.7% died, with median age at death 41.8 years.  Of note, age at death was not statistically different between pretricuspid and posttricuspid defects (46.2 vs 39.5 years; P = 0.1).  Nearly all deaths were related to ES.  Overall prognosis was poor; half of patients with posttricuspid defects died or were transplanted prior to 50 years of age; half of patients with pretricuspid defects died or underwent transplantation within 20 years after initial PAH diagnosis.

 

The authors demonstrate that patients have a better prognosis on one or two PAH-specific drugs than if they are on no therapy or triple therapy.  The study was not designed to determine a difference between being on 1 versus 2 drugs, and patients who had a 2nd drug started after initial inclusion were analyzed based on number of drugs they were taking at their most recent clinical evaluation.  Patients on triple therapy (ERA, PDE5 and IV prostanoid) tended to be sickest and have the highest risk of transplantation or death.  A total of 28/340 patients underwent transplantation in this study; 24/28 with heart-lung transplantation, and the remaining 4 with double-lung transplantation combined with percutaneous atrial septal defect closure.

 

The median age of patients was 41.0 years in the pretricuspid group and 34.4 years in the posttricuspid/combined group.  NYHA/WHO functional class was III or IV in 62.7% of patients upon drug initiation, whereas only 2.9% were NYHA/WHO class I.  Arterial oxygen saturation did not change significantly in any group.  However, the 6 minute walk distance increased significantly with PAH-specific drug therapy (from 330 meters to 364 meters), and a higher percentage of patients had improvement in NYHA/WHO FC versus those on no therapy.

 

The most common regimen was monotherapy (46.7%), predominantly with bosentan (64.3% of monotherapy patients), which has been approved for clinical use in ES in France for several years.  Dual therapy (40.9%) was provided mostly with the combination of bosentan and sildenafil.  Median time from PAH diagnosis to initiation of PAH-specific drug therapy was shorter in the pretricuspid group (9.1 months) versus the posttricuspid group (67.0 months).

 

Of note, patients on triple-therapy had a longer duration on medical therapy, a higher proportion of Pretricuspid defects, and a lower proportion of genetic syndromes, as well as a worse initial NYHA/WHO FC at time of drug initiation.  This subset also had the highest incidence of ES-related complications, and these patients were responsible for most transplantations.

achd media 9

Figure 2. Kaplan—Meier curves showing survival without major clinical events (death or transplantation) according to age at follow-up, overall and in subgroups defined by defect location, presence or absence of genetic syndrome and pulmonary arterial hypertension-specific drug therapy (PAH-SDT). Event-free survival. D. Event-free survival in patients with post-tricuspid (post-tric.) or combined defects. PAH < 40 yo: pulmonary arterial hypertension diagnosis before 40 years of age; pre-tric.: pre-tricuspid.

 

 

The Cost Differential Between Warfarin Versus Aspirin Treatment After a Fontan Procedure. Schilling C, Dalziel K, Iyengar AJ, d’Udekem Y.

Heart Lung Circ. 2017 Mar 6. pii: S1443-9506(17)30086-0. doi: 10.1016/j.hlc.2017.02.003. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 28372885

 

Take Home Points:

 Warfarin patients have an additional annual cost vs. those on aspirin.

  • Aspirin is clinically as effective as warfarin and Fontan patients would benefit from a less expensive and less time-consuming treatment.
  • Clinical consensus regarding this point will be difficult to achieve, but there are overarching socio-economic costs if we as an ACHD community fail to do so.

 

Moe_Tabitha-WEBCommentary from Dr. Tabitha Moe (Phoenix), section editor of ACHD Journal Watch:Management of post-Fontan patients with anti-coagulant vs. anti-platelet management of thrombotic risk is an ongoing debate among ACHD care teams.  This article represents the Australian perspective on this management paradigm.  This paper analyzes the societal costs of placing a patient on long-term warfarin including the patient’s travel, time away from work, and the costs to the health system.  These costs are often underappreciated and are exclusive of the costs associated with adverse events, and bleeding complications.  A randomized trial was unable to prove noninferiority of either aspirin or warfarin secondary to lack of power.  In a review of data from the ESC the model of care varies widely, and there is not consensus regarding the clinical effectiveness of aspirin over warfarin and is left to the cardiologist’s preference. This study is valuable in that they evaluated 475 patients who are status post Fontan, and so by congenital standards, this is a fairly large cohort, consistent with other studies that have come out of the NAZ collaborative. If the data from this one-year retrospective data analysis is extrapolated over a 15-year period then $5.8 million dollars could be saved, and is extrapolated over 30 years $11.6 million dollars could be saved. This type of health economics data is valuable in guiding management decision making.

 

Assessment of the systemic right ventricular function in overweight and obese patients with congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries. Kowalik E, Klisiewicz A, Biernacka EK, Hoffman P. Kardiol Pol. 2017 Mar 10. doi: 10.5603/KP.a2017.0036. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 28281729

Take Home Points:

 

  • Increasing weight in the overweight and obese range is associated with impaired systemic right ventricular systolic function in patient with CCTGA.
  • The chronic volume overload secondary to obesity may contribute to premature systemic systolic dysfunction.

  

Commentary from Dr. Tabitha Moe (Phoenix), section editor of ACHD Journal Watch: CCTGA is a rare defect of atrioventricular and ventriculo-arterial discordant connections that may go unidentified even in to late adult hood.  This small cohort paper from Poland evaluates a small cohort of 56 adults with CCTGA and only 22 of whom are considered overweight or obese (BMI >25).  Obesity results in hemodynamic changes that lead to increases in the cardiac output and systemic ventricle enlargement. Obesity may be associated with left ventricular hypertrophy, in patients with structurally normal hearts. Little is known about the influence of obesity on cardiac performance in ACHD, and there isn’t any data on patient with a systemic RV.  Their study excluded patients with hypertension, NYHA Class III/IV functional status, arrhythmia, or single ventricle palliation.  This may exclude a number of the patients about whom this data would be the most valuable, however, it makes for a less complex dataset for analysis. Interestingly, there was no observed correlation between the NT-pro BNP levels and BMI. However, the evidence in noncongenital patients is markedly significant in that obesity is associated with decreased NT-pro BNP levels compared to associated decreased systemic ventricular systolic function.  There was a significant reduction in the systemic RV longitudinal strain in the overweight/obese group.  There is also an inverse correlation between BMI and the e”/a” ratio, and a positive correlation between body mass index and left atrial area. One of the limitations of the study is the inherent limitation of imaging of the RV by echo.  As a rule, the RV remains difficult to adequately assess by echo secondary to complex geometry and proximity to the sternum, as well as increased body habitus and poor echo windows in an obese cohort. What remains unknown with this short-term study is whether or not the amount of time spent within the obese range is associated with premature development of RV dysfunction. Since body weight is a largely modifiable risk factor it may be reasonable to be more aggressive with weight management in this cohort as well as others with complex congenital heart disease.

 

 

ACHD March 2017

 

  1. Anomalous Aortic Origin of a Coronary Artery From the Inappropriate Sinus of Valsalva.

Cheezum MK, Liberthson RR, Shah NR, Villines TC, O’Gara PT, Landzberg MJ, Blankstein R.

J Am Coll Cardiol. 2017 Mar 28;69(12):1592-1608. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2017.01.031. Review.

PMID:

 

28335843

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  1. Reply: A Distinct Cardiomyopathy: HCN4 Syndrome Comprising Myocardial Noncompaction, Bradycardia, Mitral Valve Defects, and Aortic Dilation.

Arbustini E, Favalli V, Narula N, Serio A, Grasso M.

J Am Coll Cardiol. 2017 Mar 7;69(9):1210-1211. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2016.11.073. No abstract available.

PMID:

 

28254189

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  1. A Distinct Cardiomyopathy: HCN4 Syndrome Comprising Myocardial Noncompaction, Bradycardia, Mitral Valve Defects, and Aortic Dilation.

Schweizer PA, Koenen M, Katus HA, Thomas D.

J Am Coll Cardiol. 2017 Mar 7;69(9):1209-1210. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2016.10.085. No abstract available.

PMID:

 

28254188

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  1. The power in being together for young adults who haveheartdisease – the photoshoot experience.

Gallagher R, Potter E, Thomson Mangnall L, Ladak L, Gallagher P, Neubeck L.

Heart Lung. 2017 Mar 30. pii: S0147-9563(17)30073-0. doi: 10.1016/j.hrtlng.2017.02.004. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:

 

28366291

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Select item 28358329 85.

 

  1. The Changing Landscape of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in the Adult withCongenital Heart Disease.

van Dissel AC, Mulder BJ, Bouma BJ.

J Clin Med. 2017 Mar 30;6(4). pii: E40. doi: 10.3390/jcm6040040. Review.

PMID:

 

28358329

Free Article

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Select item 28358424 86.

 

  1. Right ventricular function and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels in adult patients with simple dextro-transposition of the great arteries.

Martínez-Quintana E, Marrero-Negrín N, Gopar-Gopar S, Rodríguez-González F.

Echocardiography. 2017 Mar 29. doi: 10.1111/echo.13526. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:

 

28370416

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Select item 28369397 89.

 

  1. Association Between Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Aortic Stenosis: The CANHEART Aortic Stenosis Study.

Yan AT, Koh M, Chan KK, Guo H, Alter DA, Austin PC, Tu JV, Wijeysundera HC, Ko DT.

J Am Coll Cardiol. 2017 Mar 28;69(12):1523-1532. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2017.01.025.

PMID:

 

28335833

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Select item 28359691 92.

 

  1. Red Flags for Maltese Adults withCongenital Heart Disease: Poorer Dental Care and Less Sports Participation Compared to Other European Patients-An APPROACH-IS Substudy.

Caruana M, Apers S, Kovacs AH, Luyckx K, Thomet C, Budts W, Sluman M, Eriksen K, Dellborg M, Berghammer M, Johansson B, Soufi A, Callus E, Moons P, Grech V; APPROACH-IS consortium and the International Society for Adult Congenital Heart Disease (ISACHD)..

Pediatr Cardiol. 2017 Mar 24. doi: 10.1007/s00246-017-1604-y. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:

 

28341902

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Select item 28337810 100.

 

  1. Educational needs of adolescents withcongenital heart disease: Impact of a transition intervention programme.

Ladouceur M, Calderon J, Traore M, Cheurfi R, Pagnon C, Khraiche D, Bajolle F, Bonnet D.

Arch Cardiovasc Dis. 2017 Mar 22. pii: S1875-2136(17)30057-8. doi: 10.1016/j.acvd.2017.02.001. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:

 

28342658

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Select item 28327570 104.

 

  1. Longitudinal Evaluation of Aortic Hemodynamics in Marfan Syndrome: New Insights from a 4D Flow Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Multi-Year Follow-Up Study.

Geiger J, Hirtler D, Gottfried K, Rahman O, Bollache E, Barker AJ, Markl M, Stiller B.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson. 2017 Mar 22;19(1):33. doi: 10.1186/s12968-017-0347-5.

PMID:

 

28327193

Free PMC Article

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Select item 28343629 106.

 

  1. Executive Summary: Trends in U.S. Cardiovascular Care: 2016 Report From 4 ACC National Cardiovascular Data Registries.

Masoudi FA, Ponirakis A, de Lemos JA, Jollis JG, Kremers M, Messenger JC, Moore JW, Moussa I, Oetgen WJ, Varosy PD, Vincent RN, Wei J, Curtis JP, Roe MT, Spertus JA.

J Am Coll Cardiol. 2017 Mar 21;69(11):1424-1426. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2016.12.004. Epub 2016 Dec 23. No abstract available.

PMID:

 

28025066

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Select item 28025065 109.

 

  1. Trends in U.S. Cardiovascular Care: 2016 Report From 4 ACC National Cardiovascular Data Registries.

Masoudi FA, Ponirakis A, de Lemos JA, Jollis JG, Kremers M, Messenger JC, Moore JW, Moussa I, Oetgen WJ, Varosy PD, Vincent RN, Wei J, Curtis JP, Roe MT, Spertus JA.

J Am Coll Cardiol. 2017 Mar 21;69(11):1427-1450. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2016.12.005. Epub 2016 Dec 23. Review.

PMID:

 

28025065

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Select item 28242061 110.

 

  1. Noninvasive Imaging in AdultCongenital Heart Disease.

Burchill LJ, Huang J, Tretter JT, Khan AM, Crean AM, Veldtman GR, Kaul S, Broberg CS.

Circ Res. 2017 Mar 17;120(6):995-1014. doi: 10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.116.308983.

PMID:

 

28302744

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Select item 28302743 120.

 

  1. Changing Landscape ofCongenital Heart Disease.

Bouma BJ, Mulder BJ.

Circ Res. 2017 Mar 17;120(6):908-922. doi: 10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.116.309302.

PMID:

 

28302739

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Select item 28302738 125.

 

  1. Congenital Heart Disease: The Remarkable Journey From the “Post-Mortem Room” to Adult Clinics.

Marian AJ.

Circ Res. 2017 Mar 17;120(6):895-897. doi: 10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.117.310830. No abstract available.

PMID:

 

28302735

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Select item 28367436 129.

 

  1. Systolic ejection click versus split firstheartsound: Are our ears deceiving us?

Hoeting NM, McCracken CE, McConnell M, Sallee D, Iannucci GJ, Oster ME.

Congenit Heart Dis. 2017 Mar 16. doi: 10.1111/chd.12460. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:

 

28299882

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Select item 28299880 134.

 

  1. Contraceptive Practices of Women With ComplexCongenital Heart Disease.

Miner PD, Canobbio MM, Pearson DD, Schlater M, Balon Y, Junge KJ, Bhatt A, Barber D, Nickolaus MJ, Kovacs AH, Moons P, Shaw K, Fernandes SM.

Am J Cardiol. 2017 Mar 15;119(6):911-915. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2016.11.047. Epub 2016 Dec 18.

PMID:

 

28087052

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Select item 28318514 142.

 

  1. Three decades later: The fate of the population of patients who underwent the Atriopulmonary Fontan procedure.

Poh CL, Zannino D, Weintraub RG, Winlaw DS, Grigg LE, Cordina R, Hornung T, Bullock A, Justo RN, Gentles TL, Verrall C, du Plessis K, Celermajer DS, d’Udekem Y.

Int J Cardiol. 2017 Mar 15;231:99-104. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2017.01.057. Epub 2017 Jan 7.

PMID:

 

28100430

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Select item 28096041 150.

 

  1. Advance Care Planning in Adults withCongenital Heart Disease: A Patient Priority.

Deng LX, Gleason LP, Khan AM, Drajpuch D, Fuller S, Goldberg LA, Mascio CE, Partington SL, Tobin L, Kim YY, Kovacs AH.

Int J Cardiol. 2017 Mar 15;231:105-109. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2016.12.185. Epub 2017 Jan 4.

PMID:

 

28096041

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Select item 28082094 151.

 

  1. Effects of acute oxygen supplementation on functional capacity andheartrate recovery in Eisenmenger syndrome.

Gonzaga LR, Matos-Garcia BC, Rocco IS, Begot I, Bolzan DW, Tatani SB, Santos VB, Silva CM, Carvalho AC, Arena R, Gomes WJ, Guizilini S.

Int J Cardiol. 2017 Mar 15;231:110-114. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2017.01.025. Epub 2017 Jan 6.

PMID:

 

28082094

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Select item 28293318 152.

 

  1. Characteristics and outcomes ofheartfailure-related hospitalization in adults with congenital heart disease.

Moussa NB, Karsenty C, Pontnau F, Malekzadeh-Milani S, Boudjemline Y, Legendre A, Bonnet D, Iserin L, Ladouceur M.

Arch Cardiovasc Dis. 2017 Mar 14. pii: S1875-2136(17)30047-5. doi: 10.1016/j.acvd.2017.01.008. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:

 

28314706

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Select item 28193604 154.

 

  1. [Adultcongenital heart disease: Medical and psychosocial issues].

Ladouceur M, Pontnau F, Iserin L.

Presse Med. 2017 Mar 14. pii: S0755-4982(17)30061-1. doi: 10.1016/j.lpm.2017.02.003. [Epub ahead of print] French.

PMID:

 

28314442

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Select item 28295809 159.

 

  1. High sensitivity cardiac troponin T and systemic right ventricular function in adults with congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries.

Kowalik E, Klisiewicz A, Rybicka J, Biernacka EK, Hoffman P.

Int J Cardiol. 2017 Mar 11. pii: S0167-5273(17)30590-9. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2017.03.043. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:

 

28302319

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Select item 28295440 165.

 

  1. At theHeartof the Pregnancy: What Prenatal and Cardiovascular Genetic Counselors Need to Know about Maternal Heart Disease.

Morales A, Allain DC, Arscott P, James E, MacCarrick G, Murray B, Tichnell C, Shikany AR, Spencer S, Fitzgerald-Butt SM, Kushner JD, Munn C, Smith E, Spoonamore KG, Tandri HS, Kay WA.

J Genet Couns. 2017 Mar 10. doi: 10.1007/s10897-017-0081-z. [Epub ahead of print] Review.

PMID:

 

28283918

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Select item 28281729 170.

 

  1. Assessment of the systemic right ventricular function in overweight and obese patients with congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries.

Kowalik E, Klisiewicz A, Biernacka EK, Hoffman P.

Kardiol Pol. 2017 Mar 10. doi: 10.5603/KP.a2017.0036. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:

 

28281729

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Select item 28331377 171.

 

  1. Outcome of adults with Eisenmenger syndrome treated with drugs specific to pulmonary arterial hypertension: A French multicentre study.

Hascoet S, Fournier E, Jaïs X, Le Gloan L, Dauphin C, Houeijeh A, Godart F, Iriart X, Richard A, Radojevic J, Amedro P, Bosser G, Souletie N, Bernard Y, Moceri P, Bouvaist H, Mauran P, Barre E, Basquin A, Karsenty C, Bonnet D, Iserin L, Sitbon O, Petit J, Fadel E, Humbert M, Ladouceur M.

Arch Cardiovasc Dis. 2017 Mar 9. pii: S1875-2136(17)30045-1. doi: 10.1016/j.acvd.2017.01.006. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:

 

28286190

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Select item 28281093 174.

 

  1. Impact of advanced medical therapy for the outcome of an adult patient with Eisenmenger syndrome.

Ereminienė E, Kinderytė M, Miliauskas S.

Respir Med Case Rep. 2017 Mar 9;21:16-20. doi: 10.1016/j.rmcr.2017.03.002. eCollection 2017.

PMID:

 

28348949

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Select item 28270245 184.

 

  1. Investigating Cardiac Motion Patterns Using Synthetic High-Resolution 3D Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Images and Statistical Shape Analysis.

Biffi B, Bruse JL, Zuluaga MA, Ntsinjana HN, Taylor AM, Schievano S.

Front Pediatr. 2017 Mar 8;5:34. doi: 10.3389/fped.2017.00034. eCollection 2017.

PMID:

 

28337429

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Select item 28274955 186

 

  1. Physical activity in adults withcongenital heart diseaseand associations with functional outcomes.

Müller J, Amberger T, Berg A, Goeder D, Remmele J, Oberhoffer R, Ewert P, Hager A.

Heart. 2017 Mar 8. pii: heartjnl-2016-310828. doi: 10.1136/heartjnl-2016-310828. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:

 

28274955

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Select item 28273359 187.

 

  1. Cardiovascular causes of maternal sudden death. Sudden arrhythmic death syndrome is leading cause in UK.

Krexi D, Sheppard MN.

Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2017 Mar 7;212:155-159. doi: 10.1016/j.ejogrb.2017.03.006. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:

 

28371698

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Select item 28266898 191.

 

  1. Aortopathies in adultcongenital heart diseaseand genetic aortopathy syndromes: management strategies and indications for surgery.

Kuijpers JM, Mulder BJ.

Heart. 2017 Mar 7. pii: heartjnl-2015-308626. doi: 10.1136/heartjnl-2015-308626. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

PMID:

 

28270426

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Select item 28286131 194.

 

  1. A case of aortic arch coarctation, bicuspid aortic valve and aortic sinus aneurysm in an adult with moderate hypertension.

Chrysohoou C, Katsi V, Trikalinos N, Tzifa A, Alexopoulos N, Brili S, Nihoyiannopoulos P, Tousoulis D.

Hellenic J Cardiol. 2017 Mar 7. pii: S1109-9666(17)30033-7. doi: 10.1016/j.hjc.2017.01.016. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

PMID:

 

28286131

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Select item 28365175 195.

 

  1. Real-world, long-term survival of incident patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

Marques-Alves P, Baptista R, Marinho da Silva A, Pêgo M, Castro G.

Rev Port Pneumol (2006). 2017 Mar 7. pii: S2173-5115(17)30030-1. doi: 10.1016/j.rppnen.2017.01.006. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:

 

28283462

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Select item 28264208 197.

 

  1. The Cost Differential Between Warfarin Versus Aspirin Treatment After a Fontan Procedure.

Schilling C, Dalziel K, Iyengar AJ, d’Udekem Y.

Heart Lung Circ. 2017 Mar 6. pii: S1443-9506(17)30086-0. doi: 10.1016/j.hlc.2017.02.003. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:

 

28372885

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Select item 28291620 203.

 

  1. Cyanoticcongenital heart diseaseand atherosclerosis.

Tarp JB, Jensen AS, Engstrøm T, Holstein-Rathlou NH, Søndergaard L.

Heart. 2017 Mar 4. pii: heartjnl-2016-311012. doi: 10.1136/heartjnl-2016-311012. [Epub ahead of print] Review.

PMID:

 

28259844

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Select item 28282821 212.

 

  1. Mortality Risk Stratification in Fontan Patients Who UnderwentHeartTransplantation.

Berg CJ, Bauer BS, Hageman A, Aboulhosn JA, Reardon LC.

Am J Cardiol. 2017 Mar 1. pii: S0002-9149(17)30191-1. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2017.02.005. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:

 

28341356

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Select item 28249863 225.

 

  1. Aortic assessment of bicuspid aortic valve patients and their first-degree relatives.

Straneo P, Parma G, Lluberas N, Marichal A, Soca G, Cura L, Paganini JJ, Brusich D, Florio L, Dayan V.

Asian Cardiovasc Thorac Ann. 2017 Mar;25(3):192-198. doi: 10.1177/0218492317696375. Epub 2017 Jan 1.

PMID:

 

28325072

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Select item 28303211 231.

 

  1. Real-Time Three-Dimensional Echocardiography: Characterization of Cardiac Anatomy and Function-Current Clinical Applications and Literature Review Update.

Velasco O, Beckett MQ, James AW, Loehr MN, Lewis TG, Hassan T, Janardhanan R.

Biores Open Access. 2017 Mar 1;6(1):15-18. doi: 10.1089/biores.2016.0033. eCollection 2017. Review.

PMID:

 

28303211

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Select item 27101836 232.

 

  1. Leukocytoclastic vasculitis associated with endocarditis in a patient with transposition of the great arteries and mechanical valve replacement.

Riehle C, Scharf GM, Sieweke JT, Zauner F, Flierl U, Treptau J, Zormpas C, Senf J, McCarty NS, Bauersachs J, Sedding DG, Westhoff-Bleck M.

Cardiovasc Pathol. 2017 Mar – Apr;27:68-70. doi: 10.1016/j.carpath.2017.01.005. Epub 2017 Jan 24.

PMID:

 

28171828

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Select item 28131074 241.

 

  1. Thrombosis of a mechanical prosthetic aortic valve in early pregnancy: histopathological findings.

Scheidmann R, Foth R, Sigler M.

Cardiovasc Pathol. 2017 Mar – Apr;27:35-36. doi: 10.1016/j.carpath.2016.12.003. Epub 2017 Jan 2.

PMID:

 

28081513

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Select item 27847261 243.

 

  1. Bicuspid aortic valve aortopathy: mechanistic and clinical insights from recent studies.

Guzzardi DG, Verma S, Fedak PW.

Curr Opin Cardiol. 2017 Mar;32(2):111-116. doi: 10.1097/HCO.0000000000000359.

PMID:

 

28182589

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Select item 28181314 255.

 

  1. Frontiers of valvularheartdisease: from aortic stenosis to the tricuspid valve and congenital anomalies.

Lüscher TF.

Eur Heart J. 2017 Mar 1;38(9):611-614. doi: 10.1093/eurheartj/ehx083. No abstract available.

PMID:

 

28363226

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Select item 26491108 260.

 

  1. Recommendations on the echocardiographic assessment of aortic valve stenosis: a focused update from the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging and the American Society of Echocardiography.

Baumgartner H Chair, Hung J Co-Chair, Bermejo J, Chambers JB, Edvardsen T, Goldstein S, Lancellotti P, LeFevre M, Miller F Jr, Otto CM.

Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Imaging. 2017 Mar 1;18(3):254-275. doi: 10.1093/ehjci/jew335.

PMID:

 

28363204

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Select item 28363200 262.

 

  1. Evolution of right ventricular size over time after tetralogy of Fallot repair: a longitudinal cardiac magnetic resonance study.

Rutz T, Ghandour F, Meierhofer C, Naumann S, Martinoff S, Lange R, Ewert P, Stern HC, Fratz S.

Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Imaging. 2017 Mar 1;18(3):364-370. doi: 10.1093/ehjci/jew273.

PMID:

 

28363200

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Select item 28082474 263.

 

  1. Abnormal Wave Reflections and Left Ventricular Hypertrophy Late After Coarctation of the Aorta Repair.

Quail MA, Short R, Pandya B, Steeden JA, Khushnood A, Taylor AM, Segers P, Muthurangu V.

Hypertension. 2017 Mar;69(3):501-509. doi: 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.116.08763. Epub 2017 Jan 23.

PMID:

 

28115510

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Select item 28070870 273.

 

  1. Hopelessness among adults withcongenital heart disease: Cause for despair or hope?

Eslami B, Kovacs AH, Moons P, Abbasi K, Jackson JL.

Int J Cardiol. 2017 Mar 1;230:64-69. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2016.12.090. Epub 2016 Dec 21.

PMID:

 

28038812

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Select item 27989580 276.

 

  1. Pregnancy in women with complete transposition of the great arteries following the atrial switch procedure. A study from three of the largest AdultCongenital Heart Diseasecenters in Poland.

Lipczyńska M, Szymański P, Trojnarska O, Tomkiewicz-Pająk L, Pietrzak B, Klisiewicz A, Kumor M, Podolec P, Hoffman P.

J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2017 Mar;30(5):563-567. doi: 10.1080/14767058.2016.1177821. Epub 2016 May 5.

PMID:

 

27072884

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Select item 27987336 287.

 

  1. Wish to conceive and concerns to develop cardiovascular complications during pregnancy in patients with Turner syndrome.

van Hagen IM, Duijnhouwer AL, Ten Kate-Booij MJ, Dykgraaf RH, Duvekot JJ, Utens EM, Roos-Hesselink JW.

J Psychosom Obstet Gynaecol. 2017 Mar;38(1):45-52. doi: 10.1080/0167482X.2016.1216961. Epub 2016 Sep 1.

PMID:

 

27584042

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Select item 28183396 295.

 

  1. Liver health in adults with Fontan circulation: A multicenter cross-sectional study.

Wu FM, Kogon B, Earing MG, Aboulhosn JA, Broberg CS, John AS, Harmon A, Sainani NI, Hill AJ, Odze RD, Johncilla ME, Ukomadu C, Gauvreau K, Valente AM, Landzberg MJ; Alliance for Adult Research in Congenital Cardiology (AARCC) Investigators..

J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2017 Mar;153(3):656-664. doi: 10.1016/j.jtcvs.2016.10.060. Epub 2016 Nov 12.

PMID:

 

27955914

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Select item 28221263 297.

 

  1. Measurement of Aortic Valve Coaptation and Effective Height Using Echocardiography in Patients with Ventricular Septal Defects and Aortic Valve Prolapse.

Iwashima S, Uchiyama H, Ishikawa T, Takigiku K, Takahashi K, Toyono M, Inoue N, Nii M.

Pediatr Cardiol. 2017 Mar;38(3):608-616. doi: 10.1007/s00246-016-1555-8. Epub 2017 Jan 21.

PMID:

 

28108755

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Select item 28078382 308.

 

  1. Timing and Mode of Delivery in Prenatally DiagnosedCongenital Heart Disease– an Analysis of Practices within the University of California Fetal Consortium (UCfC).

Peyvandi S, Nguyen TA, Almeida-Jones M, Boe N, Rhee L, Anton T, Sklansky M, Tarsa M, Satou G, Moon-Grady AJ; University of California Fetal Consortium (UCfC)..

Pediatr Cardiol. 2017 Mar;38(3):588-595. doi: 10.1007/s00246-016-1552-y. Epub 2017 Jan 11.

PMID:

 

28078382

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Select item 28058479 309.

 

  1. Intra- and inter-reader reproducibility of blood flow measurements on the ascending aorta and pulmonary artery using cardiac magnetic resonance.

Di Leo G, D’Angelo ID, Alì M, Cannaò PM, Mauri G, Secchi F, Sardanelli F.

Radiol Med. 2017 Mar;122(3):179-185. doi: 10.1007/s11547-016-0706-6. Epub 2016 Nov 22.

PMID:

 

27878504

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Select item 28107799 326.

 

  1. AdultCongenitalCardiac Care.

Kogon BE, Miller K, Miller P, Alsoufi B, Rosenblum JM.

World J Pediatr Congenit Heart Surg. 2017 Mar;8(2):242-247. doi: 10.1177/2150135117690126.

PMID:

 

28329454

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Select item 28329450 334.

 

  1. A novel FBN1 mutation in a family with inherited Marfan Syndrome: p.Cys2672Arg.

Cetinkaya A, Karaman A, Mutlu MB, Yavuz T.

Congenit Anom (Kyoto). 2017 Mar 20. doi: 10.1111/cga.12220. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

PMID:

 

28321935

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Select item 28316282 114.

 

  1. The importance of the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

Ozyilmaz S, Akgul O, Uyarel H, Pusuroglu H, Gul M, Satilmisoglu MH, Bolat I, Ozyilmaz I, Uçar H, Yildirim A, Bakir I.

Rev Port Cardiol. 2017 Mar 17. pii: S0870-2551(17)30126-9. doi: 10.1016/j.repc.2016.09.014. [Epub ahead of print] English, Portuguese.

PMID:

 

28318851

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Select item 28302079 129.

 

  1. Contraceptive Practices of Women With Complex Congenital Heart Disease.

Miner PD, Canobbio MM, Pearson DD, Schlater M, Balon Y, Junge KJ, Bhatt A, Barber D, Nickolaus MJ, Kovacs AH, Moons P, Shaw K, Fernandes SM.

Am J Cardiol. 2017 Mar 15;119(6):911-915. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2016.11.047. Epub 2016 Dec 18.

PMID:

 

28087052

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Select item 28318514 137.

 

  1. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Youth Athletes: Successful Screening With Point-of-Care Ultrasound by Medical Students.

Fox JC, Lahham S, Maldonado G, Klaus S, Aish B, Sylwanowicz LV, Yanuck J, Wilson SP, Shieh M, Anderson CL, English C, Mayer R, Mohan UR.

J Ultrasound Med. 2017 Mar 4. doi: 10.7863/ultra.16.06044. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:

 

28258593

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Select item 28285118 198.

 

  1. International criteria for electrocardiographic interpretation in athletes.

Drezner JA, Sharma S, Baggish A, Papadakis M, Wilson MG, Prutkin JM, Gerche A, Ackerman MJ, Borjesson M, Salerno JC, Asif IM, Owens DS, Chung EH, Emery MS, Froelicher VF, Heidbuchel H, Adamuz C, Asplund CA, Cohen G, Harmon KG, Marek JC, Molossi S, Niebauer J, Pelto HF, Perez MV, Riding NR, Saarel T, Schmied CM, Shipon DM, Stein R, Vetter VL, Pelliccia A, Corrado D.

Br J Sports Med. 2017 Mar 3. pii: bjsports-2016-097331. doi: 10.1136/bjsports-2016-097331. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:

 

28258178

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Select item 28323976 200

  1. Chronobiology of Acute Aortic Dissection in the Marfan Syndrome (from the National Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions and the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection).

Siddiqi HK, Luminais SN, Montgomery D, Bossone E, Dietz H, Evangelista A, Isselbacher E, LeMaire S, Manfredini R, Milewicz D, Nienaber CA, Roman M, Sechtem U, Silberbach M, Eagle KA, Pyeritz RE; GenTAC and IRAD investigators..

Am J Cardiol. 2017 Mar 1;119(5):785-789. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2016.11.021. Epub 2016 Dec 2.

PMID:

 

28065489

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Select item 27649290 211.

 

  1. Current attitudes and clinical practice towards the care of pregnant women with underlying CHD: a paediatric cardiologyperspective.

Cribbs MG, Briston DA, Zaidi AN.

Cardiol Young. 2017 Mar;27(2):236-242. doi: 10.1017/S104795111600038X. Epub 2016 Apr 11.

PMID:

 

27064196

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Select item 28252675 231.

 

  1. Thrombosis of a mechanical prosthetic aortic valve in early pregnancy: histopathological findings.

Scheidmann R, Foth R, Sigler M.

Cardiovasc Pathol. 2017 Mar – Apr;27:35-36. doi: 10.1016/j.carpath.2016.12.003. Epub 2017 Jan 2.

PMID:

 

28081513

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Select item 27888578 233.

 

  1. Visualization of perimembranous ventricular septal defect with ruptured sinus of Valsalva aneurysm by three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography and multidetector three-dimensional computed tomography.

Mahara K, Saito M, Fukumoto R, Tamura H, Kin H, Takanashi S.

J Echocardiogr. 2017 Mar;15(1):37-38. doi: 10.1007/s12574-016-0299-z. Epub 2016 Jun 3. No abstract available.

PMID:

 

27260005

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Select item 28258912 275.

 

  1. Bicuspid aortic valve and the specialty clinic: are your patients at risk?

Fedak PW.

Cardiol Young. 2017 Mar 6:1-2. doi: 10.1017/S1047951117000282. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

PMID:

 

28260551

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Select item 28260550 25.

 

  1. Hepatocellular carcinoma in the adult Fontan patient.

Conroy MR, Moe TG.

Cardiol Young. 2017 Mar;27(2):407-409. doi: 10.1017/S1047951116001360. Epub 2016 Sep 19.

PMID:

 

27640301

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Select item 27573031 48.

 

ACHD Featured Articles of February 2016

1. An Integrated Adult Congenital Heart Disease Psychology Service.

Ferguson M, Kovacs AH.

Congenit Heart Dis. 2016 Feb 26. doi: 10.1111/chd.12331. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26918262

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Select item 26768968

Kay_William_MD.16.CVaComment from Dr. W. Aaron Kay (Indianapolis), section co-editor of ACHD Journal Watch:  Ferguson and Kovacs present the first study documenting effective reduction in psychological stress with targeted psychotherapy being offered in a dedicated ACHD-specific psychology service.  In this study, they reviewed the outcomes of 100 consecutive ACHD patients referred for “in-house” psychological services.  Of those who consented for treatment, 88% of patients noted reduced or absent psychological distress after an average of 8 psychologic sessions.

The majority of psychological distress found in this study stemmed from depression or anxiety related to heart health. This finding highlights the advantage of having psychology services housed within an ACHD unit, in order to guarantee close collaboration between an ACHD cardiologist and a mental health professional, and also to ensure that the psychologist is somewhat familiar with the medical complexities of patients living with CHD.

Interestingly, Ferguson and Kovacs were able to demonstrate this despite their inability to bill for these services, as psychology services are not reimbursed by the public health care system in Canada.  This study will hopefully pave the ground to demonstrate to payors that dedicated psychology services should be integrated into standard ACHD comprehensive care.

Take home points:

  1. Psychology services will help benefit ACHD patients and can effectively be integrated within an ACHD center.
  2. Further studies like this will hopefully increase funding for availability of psychology   services within ACHD programs.
  3. Up to one-third of ACHD patients in North America will have clinically significant depression or anxiety, with the majority of it related to concerns about heart health.

 

2. Cardiac output as a predictor in congenital heart disease: Are we stating the obvious?

Abualsaud AO, Lowe BS, Guo K, Marelli AJ, Kaouache M, Guo L, Jutras L, Martucci G, Therrien J.

Int J Cardiol. 2016 Feb 8;210:143-148. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2016.02.071. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26945436

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Select item 26860418

Comment from Dr. W. Aaron Kay (Indianapolis), section co-editor of ACHD Journal Watch:  The Montreal group performed a very well-done study exploring a simple but overlooked concept: direct measurement of systemic cardiac output.  In this study, they retrospectively calculated systemic cardiac output on all ACHD patients receiving cardiac MRI over a two year period, and also evaluated standard measurements commonly used to make clinical decisions, including LVEF, RVEF, regurgitant fraction, and chamber sizes in systole and diastole.  Via chart review, they evaluated predictors of cardiac-related hospitalizations for CHF, angina, arrhythmias, and syncope/presyncope.

A low cardiac index (defined as C.I. < 2.4 LPM/m2) was found to be the best predictor of hospitalization for patients over an average follow up of nearly four years.  The hazard ratio of a low cardiac output, as a predictor for hospitalization, was HR 3.55 (95% CI 1.48-8.50), whereas individual components of the cardiac output, including LVEF, RVEF, RVEDVi, RVESVi, and pulmonary regurgitant fraction, were not predictive of hospitalization.

They constructed a receiver operator curve to determine best predictors of low C.I., which were LVEF (AUC = 0.74), RVEF (AUC = 0.71), and total RV regurgitant volume (AUC = 0.64) and RVESV (AUC = 0.563).  Interestingly, RVEDV was not found to be a predictor of either low C.I. or for hospitalizations, although this may have been due to a small sample size as well as a very large standard deviation in the RVEDV measurements in the study.

The study does provide additional data to support guidelines we already have.   Prior work shows that an RVESVi > 85 ml/m2 and an RVEF < 40% are associated with worse outcomes in patients with pulmonary regurgitation.  In this study, the group with low C.I. had an average RVESVi of 89 ml/m2 (versus 71 in the normal C.I. group), and the mean RVEF in the low C.I. group was 42% versus 49% in the normal C.I. group.  Another important point is that many patients without overt symptoms had a low C.I., whereas some patients with significant symptoms were found to have normal C.I., which perhaps emphasizes that symptoms are not always cardiac in origin, but could be due to deconditioning, pulmonary, or other noncardiac causes.

Although this study is a good starting point, it was limited in that the majority of patients either had tetralogy of Fallot or pulmonary regurgitation due to previously repaired pulmonary stenosis.  Mixed in with this were other diseases in which pulmonary regurgitation is not a major feature, such as L-TGA and D-TGA.  The “other” group included 13/96 patients, which may or may not have included single ventricle patients.  Thus it may be hard to draw conclusions with very different physiology from one disease to the next.  Additionally, admissions were not recorded if they were for “elective” admissions for cardiac surgery, so in this study it is not clear if cardiac output itself is low in those who are being scheduled for routine pulmonary valve replacement.  A large number (60/96, or 62.5%) of patients in this study had at least one cardiac admission during the study period – this number seems high, and perhaps patients receiving MRI were sicker in the first place.

Take home points:

  1. Low cardiac output (C.I. 2.4 ml/kg/m2) is easily measured by cardiac MRI and is the best MRI predictor of CHD-related hospitalizations in an ACHD population of right-sided diseases (TOF, Ebstein’s, TGA, and others).
  2. An RVESVi > 85 ml/m2 correlates with low cardiac output.
  3. Whether a low MRI-measured cardiac output predicts mortality will need to be evaluated in a larger cohort of patients.
  4. Should our guidelines for pulmonary valve replacement be modified to explicitly list low cardiac output as a reason for intervention?

 

 

3. Fontan circulation causes early, severe liver damage. Should we offer patients a tailored strategy?

Agnoletti G, Ferraro G, Bordese R, Marini D, Gala S, Bergamasco L, Ferroni F, Calvo PL, Barletti C, Cisarò F, Longo F, Napoleone CP.

Int J Cardiol. 2016 Feb 3;209:60-65. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2016.02.041. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26882184

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Select item 26848189

Comment from Dr. W. Aaron Kay (Indianapolis), section co-editor of ACHD Journal Watch:  The majority of work evaluating the liver in the current literature has focused on adults, in which, perhaps, the hepatic damage is already done.  This study from Turin, Italy, is the first study to comprehensively evaluate the liver relatively early after Fontan, with the average patient being still a teenager (age range 9-18, mean 14.5 years), in a large cohort of 64 patients in a single center.

In this study, every patient who consented underwent a thorough panel of liver tests including abdominal ultrasound, liver elastography, EGD, and biochemistry to calculate MELD-XI scores, in addition to standard cardiac testing, including echocardiography, catheterization, and clinical evaluation.  Although liver biopsy was not part of the research protocol, two patients underwent liver biopsy for clinical reasons, 7 and 8 years post TCPC.  Testing was performed anywhere from 1-15 years post Fontan.

This population included 8 patients with advanced disease, 5 with plastic bronchitis, and 3 with protein-losing enteropathy.  This is a surprisingly large number for a young population, although the majority of patients had minimal symptoms early on.

Cardiac output was found to be stable for 1-5 years after Fontan, and then progressively start decreasing.  Higher NYHA class was found to correlate with higher hepatic pressures on catheterization, despite preserved systolic function of the single ventricle.

A large percentage of patients (22%) were found to have cirrhosis, which was broadly defined as: a) liver cirrhosis confirmed by biopsy (the authors didn’t state if this was just grade 3-4 fibrosis or if earlier stages were also included); b) evidence of ascites, varices, hepatic encephalopathy, or other complications of cirrhosis; or c) a platelet count < 100,000/mm3 with an abnormal liver ultrasound.  Certainly, the exact definition of cirrhosis will vary from study to study.

Liver stiffness (LS) was high in most patients, and increased during the first 5 years post Fontan, but then was found to plateau the following 5 years.  Although the change in LS was not linear with duration since Fontan, given the rapid change in LS early after Fontan, the authors concluded that Fontan completion causes immediate hemodynamic changes followed by a slower worsening of the liver over a mid-term period. The initial mean LS was 12.2 KPa, but was a mean of 17.5 KPa 5 years post-Fontan.  This finding needs to be taking with a grain of salt, given that it was a cross-sectional, rather than longitudinal study, but given that all patients were in the same surgical era with the same type of Fontan being performed, it is likely that the same findings would have been obtained if each individual patient had serial studies.

For patients above 12 years of age, LS correlated in a linear fashion with the MELD-XI (model of end stage liver disease excluding INR).  Median MELD-XI score was 9 (range 8.5-12).   The MELD-XI score was significantly higher in patients who were more than 10 years post Fontan completion (11 (9-13) versus 9 (8-10), p = 0.01).  Patients with either higher pulmonary artery pressures (PAP >= 15 mmHg) or a PVR >= 2 WU * m2 had higher hepatic pressures (p < 0.0001), a higher incidence of liver collaterals and/or esophageal varices (p < 0.0001) and splenomegaly (p < 0.02).  It did not seem to matter if an 18 mm versus 20 mm conduit was used for the Fontan circuit in this study.

In this study, there was no significant hepatic venous wedge gradient, despite evidence of portal hypertension by imaging criteria.  This goes along with other recent studies showing that the hepatic wedge pressure is likely not helpful in ascertaining which Fontan patients are at high risk of progressive cirrhosis.

The authors conclude that patients should have early aggressive therapy immediately post Fontan to prevent irreversible cirrhosis, and suggest that endothelin receptor blockers and angiotensin receptor blockers may be useful for this.  They briefly suggest the notion of performing early cardiac transplant prior to the development of cirrhosis, or abandoning the Fontan altogether and to allow a moderate degree of cyanosis in order to preserve the liver.

Take home points:

  1. The Fontan causes early deleterious changes in liver hemodynamics that can be assessed early by liver elastography and MELD-XI score. These change rapidly early post Fontan, even in a pediatric population.
  2. Liver stiffness increases soon after Fontan completion, and remains stable for the first 5 years in a pediatric population.
  3. Normal ventricular systolic function is not protective against liver changes, especially in patients with high PAP or high PVR.
  4. Hepatic wedge pressures do not appear to accurately reflect the actual degree of portal hypertension in the Fontan population.
  5. Early intervention post Fontan to prevent liver disease should be performed — but there is no consensus as to what exactly this early intervention should be. Perhaps pulmonary vasodilators and/or reversing the Fontan should be considered in those who show signs of liver cirrhosis.
  6. A standard definition of cirrhosis in the Fontan population will be very helpful for future studies.

 

 

4. Prognostic value of multiple biomarkers for cardiovascular mortality in adult congenital heart disease: comparisons of single-/two-ventricle physiology, and systemic morphologically right/left ventricles.

Miyamoto K, Takeuchi D, Inai K, Shinohara T, Nakanishi T.

Heart Vessels. 2016 Feb 8. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26857388

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Select item 26945436

Moe_Tabitha-WEBComment from Dr. Tabitha Moe (Phoenix) section editor of Congenital Heart Journal Watch: This single-center, retrospective cohort study from Tokyo evaluates the potential of biomarkers to predict ACHD mortality. 103 adult patients were evaluated. Patients were divided into single-ventricle, and two-ventricle physiology, and then subdivided into groups with a systemic morphologic right ventricle and a systemic morphologic left ventricle.  Patients were followed for 6.5 years.  Cardiac biomarkers are a myriad of complex interactions including markers of inflammation, neurohormones, myocyte injury, and markers of remodeling. In ACHD patients elevated levels of BNP, norepinephrine (NE), endothelin-1 (ET-1), and plasma renin activity (PRA) have been shown to correlate well with clinical variables such as NYHA classification. Patients were followed and assessed for signs of clinical worsening including NYHA classification, renal function estimated by GFR, and increasing needs for oral diuretics. Findings are consistent with the idea the clinical factor biomarkers correlate well with mortality risk of acute decompensated heart failure. Specifically in the single morphologic right ventricle group multiple cardiac biomarkers are elevated at baseline and do not correlate well with increased risk of ADHF(Acute Diastolic Heart Failure); however, elevated levels of endothelin-1 are associated with increased mortality. Interestingly increased levels of IL-6 concur with prior studies and are associated with both heart failure and severity of ventricular impairment. IL-6 was most highly associated with coronary disease in the oldest cohort of the 2-V group. Additionally, the optimal cut off values of BNP were higher than previously reported in pediatric patients at 163 pg/mL as compared with the cutoff values of 45 pg/mL as otherwise predicted for pediatric heart failure patients. The predictors of mortality vary according to physiological and morphological differences in the ventricle.   This study is stimulating, but not conclusive.  It will hopefully be followed by other, more conclusive, data.

Take home points:

  1. Two ventricle patients: BNP, and ET-1 were biomarkers predictive of heart failure.
  2. Single ventricle patients: BNP, NE, hs-CRP, sTNF-RI, IL-6, and ET-1 were all predictive.
  3. Single right ventricle patients: elevated ET-1, slightly associated with worsening heart failure.

achd 4.1

 

5. Usefulness of Direct Oral Anticoagulants in Adult Congenital Heart Disease.

Pujol C, Niesert AC, Engelhardt A, Schoen P, Kusmenkov E, Pittrow D, Ewert P, Kaemmerer H.

Am J Cardiol. 2016 Feb 1;117(3):450-5. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2015.10.062. Epub 2015 Nov 18.

PMID: 26725103

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Select item 26704031

Comment from Dr. Tabitha Moe (Phoenix) section editor of Congenital Heart Journal Watch: Thromboembolic events are common in adults with congenital heart disease.  Historically vitamin K antagonists have been the therapy of choice. Specifically this cohort is from German centers, 102 consecutive ACHD patients were enrolled. Most of the patients who were enrolled were pre-tricuspid shunts, aortic valve disease, 9 with pulmonary valve anomalies.  A small proportion had cyanosis (5), and only 3 had Fontan physiology.  Rivaroxaban was utilized by 55 patients, apixaban by 13, and dabigatran by 7 patients.  The majority of the patients were anti-coagulated for atrial arrhythmias, 11 for stroke/TIA, 4 for DVT. Of the entire cohort there were no patients who developed thrombus, no major bleeding events, and no other major side effects.  There is scarce previously published data on the use of direct oral anticoagulants in ACHD patients.  Each patient had a CHADSVASC, and a HAS-BLED score calculated.  Anti-Xa antagonists were prescribed in 68 patients and thrombin antagonists in 7 patients. This small study suggests that DOAC use is perhaps safe in noncyanotic, non-Fontan physiology ACHD patients. Not enough Fontan or cyanotic patients were enrolled to evaluate results. However, in the few patients there were no side effects, no thrombus events, or bleeding events. Further study of patients with cyanosis and Fontan physiology is needed. The NOTE Registry is an ongoing international registry for ACHD patients being transitioned from vitamin K antagonists to a DOAC.

Take Home Points:

  1. In this small study ACHD patients tolerated DOACs (both anti-Xa, and direct thrombin inhibitor agents) well.
  2. There were no events of thrombosis, bleeding or side effects.
  3. Cyanosis, and Fontan physiology were represented in very small numbers.

achd 5.1

 

6. Chronic Heart Failure in Congenital Heart Disease: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

Stout KK, Broberg CS, Book WM, Cecchin F, Chen JM, Dimopoulos K, Everitt MD, Gatzoulis M, Harris L, Hsu DT, Kuvin JT, Law Y, Martin CM, Murphy AM, Ross HJ, Singh G, Spray TL; American Heart Association Council on Clinical Cardiology, Council on Functional Genomics and Translational Biology, and Council on Cardiovascular Radiology and Imaging.

Circulation. 2016 Feb 23;133(8):770-801. doi: 10.1161/CIR.0000000000000352. Epub 2016 Jan 19. No abstract available.

PMID: 26787728

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Select item 26912652

Comment from Dr. Tabitha Moe (Phoenix) section editor of Congenital Heart Journal Watch:  An updated Scientific Statement from the AHA.

 

 

7. Current therapy and outcome of Eisenmenger syndrome: data of the German National Register for congenital heart defects.

Diller GP, Körten MA, Bauer UM, Miera O, Tutarel O, Kaemmerer H, Berger F, Baumgartner H; and German Competence Network for Congenital Heart Defects Investigators.

Eur Heart J. 2016 Feb 2. pii: ehv743. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26843280

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Select item 26833920

Comment from Dr. Tabitha Moe (Phoenix) section editor of Congenital Heart Journal Watch: Eisenmenger patients are one of our highest risk cohorts. This retrospective single-country study evaluated 153 patients in the German system with Eisenmenger syndrome (ES). Eisenmenger syndrome is defined as a multi-organ process involving elevated pulmonary arterial pressures, and right-to-left shunting/cyanosis.  This study evaluates the use of vasoactive disease targeting therapies (DTT) in ES in the German population. This allows a selection of patients without a quaternary referral bias, and perhaps provides a more realistic perspective of the entire spectrum of the disease cohort. The patients with complex defects were younger and had lower resting O2 saturations: 57.5% of the cohort was treated with one DTT, and 17.6% of the patients were treated with 2 drugs.  The majority of the patients on monotherapy were on bosentan. Most patients on dual therapy were on sildenafil and bosentan as a second line agent. 5-year survival was poor at 60.3% in treatment naïve patients, but somewhat better at 83% in the treated cohort.  No difference was found between survival in patients on mono- vs. dual therapy. There was no significant difference found between conventional medical management including digoxin, diuretics, and ACEi/ARB.

Take Home Points:

  1. Eisenmenger patients have poor survival rates in this study, with 1, 5, and 10 year survival rates of 92, 75, and 57%
  2. Survival rates were better in patients on vasodilator DTT. In this cohort that was primarily bosentan +/- sildenafil.

achd 7.1

 

8. The role of cystatin C as a biomarker for prognosis in pulmonary arterial hypertension due to congenital heart disease.

Blok IM, van Riel AC, Schuuring MJ, de Bruin-Bon RH, van Dijk AP, Hoendermis ES, Zwinderman AH, Mulder BJ, Bouma BJ.

Int J Cardiol. 2016 Feb 6;209:242-247. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2016.02.003. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26897077

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Select item 26852367

Comment from Dr. Tabitha Moe (Phoenix) section editor of Congenital Heart Journal Watch: This Netherlands study identified 59 PAH-CHD patients to include in a prospective observational study. PAH-CHD is associated with poor long-term prognosis. Patients are at risk of increasing hospitalizations, progression of heart failure, arrhythmias, and death. A biomarker predicting increased risk for future clinical events is valuable as their prognosis can then theoretically be improved by intensifying therapy. Cystatin C correlates with RV pressures, function, and morphology, reflects renal function, and myocardial remodeling. The reference values for young healthy persons range from 0.53-0.95 mg/l. Significant clinical events were comprised of worsening WHO functional classification, worsening heart failure, symptomatic hyperviscosity, hemoptysis and arrhythmia. Baseline therapy was macitentan or bosentan and sildenafil or a combination of ERA and PDE5i. 55% of patients at initial enrollment were on no disease targeting therapy.  All treatment naïve patients were started on DTT  with an ERA within 2 weeks of enrollment except for 1 who was denied coverage by insurance. 25 of the patients had elevated cystatin C levels. Patients with Trisomy-21 are more likely to have elevated levels of cystatin C.  Patients with cystatin C levels >1.10 mg/l showed a higher mortality rate. The best cut-off for NT-pro-BNP to predict mortality was 350 ng/l.  The higher mortality rate of 67% vs. 36% occurred at the 1.10 mg/l cut off. Cystatin C is a sensitive indicator of renal insufficiency and yet remained predictive of mortality even when adjusted for GFR. The direct effect of PAH specific therapy on cystatin C levels remains unknown.

Take Home Points:

  1. Cystatin C can predict long-term mortality and clinical events in patients with PAH-CHD.
  2. The combination of a cystatin C level of >1.10 mg/l and NT-pro-BNP level > 350 ng/l had a mortality rate of 58% vs. 11% in patients without both risk factors.

achd 8.1

 

 

9. Exercise Performance in Patients with D-Loop Transposition of the Great Arteries After Arterial Switch Operation: Long-Term Outcomes and Longitudinal Assessment.

Kuebler JD, Chen MH, Alexander ME, Rhodes J.

Pediatr Cardiol. 2016 Feb;37(2):283-9. doi: 10.1007/s00246-015-1275-5. Epub 2015 Oct 6.

PMID: 26439943

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Select item 26424215

Comment from Dr. Tabitha Moe (Phoenix) section editor of Congenital Heart Journal Watch: This retrospective cohort study examined patients in a single center with d-TGA who underwent neonatal arterial switch operation and had a follow up cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET).  113 patients with 186 CPET studies performed at a single institution were identified. 41 patients had more than one qualifying study. Mean age at the time of the initial study was 17. As the oldest surviving arterial switch patients enter their 4th decade of life and the decade of expected increase in acquired cardiovascular morbidity/mortality, this study was utilized to tease out the details of factors related to inferior exercise performance and to determine if function declines over time. The primary outcome variable was peak VO2%. The election of this variable accounts for age-related changes in peak VO2, patient age, size, and gender. Therefore, the patient’s peak VO2% should not change substantially over time. In the entire cohort VO2% was borderline normal with a mean value of 85% of predicted.  Patients who had also undergone VSD repairs tended to have lower peak VO2%. Variant coronary anatomy was not associated with lower peak VO2%. Patients with residual right sided obstructive lesions had reduced exercise capacity. Also, patients with reduced LV systolic function had depressed exercise capacity. Peak heart rate response to exercise appears well-preserved.  Exercise intolerance in these patients should be heeded and should drive investigations of reversible causes of poor exercise performance.

Take Home Points:

  1. The exercise capacity of ASO survivors is well preserved and is only mildly reduced when compared with normal subjects.
  2. VSD repair, residual right-sided obstructive lesions, and earlier surgical era are associated with worse exercise performance.

ACHD Articles of February 2016

  1. An Integrated Adult Congenital Heart Disease Psychology Service.

Ferguson M, Kovacs AH.

Congenit Heart Dis. 2016 Feb 26. doi: 10.1111/chd.12331. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26918262

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Select item 26768968

 

  1. A Big Five Personality Typology in Adolescents with Congenital Heart Disease: Prospective Associations with Psychosocial Functioning and Perceived Health.

Rassart J, Luyckx K, Goossens E, Oris L, Apers S, Moons P; i-DETACH investigators.

Int J Behav Med. 2016 Feb 24. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26911460

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Select item 26918828

 

  1. Counselling women with congenital cardiac disease.

Cauldwell M, Steer PJ, Johnson M, Gatzoulis M.

BMJ. 2016 Feb 23;352:i910. doi: 10.1136/bmj.i910. No abstract available.

PMID: 26907949

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Select item 26797468

 

  1. Chronic Heart Failure in Congenital Heart Disease: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

Stout KK, Broberg CS, Book WM, Cecchin F, Chen JM, Dimopoulos K, Everitt MD, Gatzoulis M, Harris L, Hsu DT, Kuvin JT, Law Y, Martin CM, Murphy AM, Ross HJ, Singh G, Spray TL; American Heart Association Council on Clinical Cardiology, Council on Functional Genomics and Translational Biology, and Council on Cardiovascular Radiology and Imaging.

Circulation. 2016 Feb 23;133(8):770-801. doi: 10.1161/CIR.0000000000000352. Epub 2016 Jan 19. No abstract available.

PMID: 26787728

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Select item 26912652

 

  1. Population-Based Data on Congenital Heart Disease and Stroke.

Opotowsky AR, Webb GD.

J Am Heart Assoc. 2016 Feb 23;5(2). pii: e003257. doi: 10.1161/JAHA.116.003257. No abstract available.

PMID: 26908414 Free Article

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Select item 26908411

 

  1. Native valve disease in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation on warfarin or rivaroxaban.

Breithardt G, Baumgartner H, Berkowitz SD, Hellkamp AS, Piccini JP, Lokhnygina Y, Halperin JL, Singer DE, Hankey GJ, Hacke W, Becker RC, Nessel CC, Mahaffey KW, Califf RM, Fox KA, Patel MR; ROCKET AF Steering Committee & Investigators.

Heart. 2016 Feb 17. pii: heartjnl-2015-308120. doi: 10.1136/heartjnl-2015-308120. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26888572

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Select item 26899545

 

  1. Acute Myocardial Infarction in Adult Congenital Patients with Bodily Isomerism.

Loomba RS, Aggarwal S, Buelow M, Nijhawan K, Gupta N, Alla V, Arora RR.

Congenit Heart Dis. 2016 Feb 16. doi: 10.1111/chd.12336. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26879777

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Select item 26879728

 

  1. Challenges and management issues in adults with cyanotic congenital heart disease.

Broberg CS.

Heart. 2016 Feb 16. pii: heartjnl-2015-308042. doi: 10.1136/heartjnl-2015-308042. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

PMID: 26884458

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Select item 26883898

 

  1. Physiologic determinants of exercise capacity in patients with different types of right-sided regurgitant lesions: Ebstein’s malformation with tricuspid regurgitation and repaired tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary regurgitation.

Chen SS, Dimopoulos K, Sheehan FH, Gatzoulis MA, Kilner PJ.

Int J Cardiol. 2016 Feb 15;205:1-5. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2015.10.175. Epub 2015 Oct 25.

PMID: 26703376

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Select item 26743086

 

  1. Metabolic Syndrome in Adults With Congenital Heart Disease.

Deen JF, Krieger EV, Slee AE, Arslan A, Arterburn D, Stout KK, Portman MA.

J Am Heart Assoc. 2016 Feb 12;5(2). pii: e001132. doi: 10.1161/JAHA.114.001132.

PMID: 26873680 Free Article

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Select item 26871420

 

  1. Assessment of the precision and reproducibility of ventricular volume, function, and mass measurements with ferumoxytol-enhanced 4D flow MRI.

Hanneman K, Kino A, Cheng JY, Alley MT, Vasanawala SS.

J Magn Reson Imaging. 2016 Feb 12. doi: 10.1002/jmri.25180. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26871420

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Select item 26896890

 

  1. Asymmetric Parachute-Like Tricuspid Valve with Severe Tricuspid Regurgitation in an Adult Patient.

Güvenç TS, Gök G, Erer HB, Ekmekçi A, Eren M.

Echocardiography. 2016 Feb 11. doi: 10.1111/echo.13196. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

PMID: 26864561

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Select item 26873095

 

  1. Prognostic value of multiple biomarkers for cardiovascular mortality in adult congenital heart disease: comparisons of single-/two-ventricle physiology, and systemic morphologically right/left ventricles.

Miyamoto K, Takeuchi D, Inai K, Shinohara T, Nakanishi T.

Heart Vessels. 2016 Feb 8. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26857388

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Select item 26945436

 

  1. Cardiac output as a predictor in congenital heart disease: Are we stating the obvious?

Abualsaud AO, Lowe BS, Guo K, Marelli AJ, Kaouache M, Guo L, Jutras L, Martucci G, Therrien J.

Int J Cardiol. 2016 Feb 8;210:143-148. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2016.02.071. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26945436

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Select item 26860418

 

  1. [Infective endocarditis in adult patients with congenital heart disease. Experience from a reference centre].

Loureiro-Amigo J, Fernández-Hidalgo N, Pijuan-Domènech A, Dos-Subirà L, Subirana-Domènech T, Gonzàlez-Alujas T, González-López JJ, Tornos-Mas P, García-Dorado D, Almirante B.

Enferm Infecc Microbiol Clin. 2016 Feb 6. pii: S0213-005X(16)00029-X. doi: 10.1016/j.eimc.2016.01.004. [Epub ahead of print] Spanish.

PMID: 26860418

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Select item 26897077

 

  1. The role of cystatin C as a biomarker for prognosis in pulmonary arterial hypertension due to congenital heart disease.

Blok IM, van Riel AC, Schuuring MJ, de Bruin-Bon RH, van Dijk AP, Hoendermis ES, Zwinderman AH, Mulder BJ, Bouma BJ.

Int J Cardiol. 2016 Feb 6;209:242-247. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2016.02.003. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26897077

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Select item 26852367

 

  1. Cardiac magnetic resonance findings predicting mortality in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Baggen VJ, Leiner T, Post MC, van Dijk AP, Roos-Hesselink JW, Boersma E, Habets J, Sieswerda GT.

Eur Radiol. 2016 Feb 4. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26847041

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Select item 26843031

 

  1. Global area strain is a sensitive marker of subendocardial damage in adults after optimal repair of aortic coarctation: three-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography data.

Kowalik E, Kowalski M, Klisiewicz A, Hoffman P.

Heart Vessels. 2016 Feb 3. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26843196

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Select item 26843030

 

  1. Persistent left superior vena cava: Two case reports and a review from nephrologists’ perspective.

Sahutoglu T, Sakaci T, Kara E, Ahbap E, Basturk T, Koc Y, Sevinc M, Akgol C, Kayarlar AO, Ucar ZA, Caglayan FB, Hasbal NB, Nazif P, Isleem M, Sahutoglu E, Unsal A.

Hemodial Int. 2016 Feb 3. doi: 10.1111/hdi.12389. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26843030

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Select item 26901788

 

  1. Bicuspid aortic valve complicated by pseudo-aneurysm of aortic root abscess.

Huang S, Sun JP, Sun Z, Chen Y, Li L, Hu J, Cheng Q, Yang XS, Chen D, Yu CM.

Int J Cardiol. 2016 Feb 3;209:275-277. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2016.02.057. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

PMID: 26901788

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Select item 26882184

 

  1. Fontan circulation causes early, severe liver damage. Should we offer patients a tailored strategy?

Agnoletti G, Ferraro G, Bordese R, Marini D, Gala S, Bergamasco L, Ferroni F, Calvo PL, Barletti C, Cisarò F, Longo F, Napoleone CP.

Int J Cardiol. 2016 Feb 3;209:60-65. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2016.02.041. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26882184

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Select item 26848189

 

  1. Idiopathic aneurysm of the pulmonary artery in a patient with coronary disease.

Tomic S, Nikolic A, Jovovic L, Gradinac S.

Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg. 2016 Feb 3. pii: ivv399. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

PMID: 26848189 Free Article

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Select item 26839982

 

  1. Twist of Fate for Simple Congenital Heart Defects.

Opotowsky AR, Krieger EV.

Circulation. 2016 Feb 2;133(5):460-2. doi: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.115.020529. Epub 2015 Dec 18. No abstract available.

PMID: 26683489

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Select item 26683488

 

  1. Current therapy and outcome of Eisenmenger syndrome: data of the German National Register for congenital heart defects.

Diller GP, Körten MA, Bauer UM, Miera O, Tutarel O, Kaemmerer H, Berger F, Baumgartner H; and German Competence Network for Congenital Heart Defects Investigators.

Eur Heart J. 2016 Feb 2. pii: ehv743. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26843280

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Select item 26833920

 

  1. Usefulness of Direct Oral Anticoagulants in Adult Congenital Heart Disease.

Pujol C, Niesert AC, Engelhardt A, Schoen P, Kusmenkov E, Pittrow D, Ewert P, Kaemmerer H.

Am J Cardiol. 2016 Feb 1;117(3):450-5. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2015.10.062. Epub 2015 Nov 18.

PMID: 26725103

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Select item 26704031

 

  1. Speckle-tracking imaging in patients with Eisenmenger syndrome.

Moceri P, Iriart X, Bouvier P, Baudouy D, Gibelin P, Saady R, Laïk J, Cerboni P, Thambo JB, Ferrari E.

Arch Cardiovasc Dis. 2016 Feb;109(2):104-12. doi: 10.1016/j.acvd.2015.11.013. Epub 2016 Feb 8.

PMID: 26868160

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Select item 26858142

 

  1. Quantification of systemic right ventricle by echocardiography.

Iriart X, Roubertie F, Jalal Z, Thambo JB.

Arch Cardiovasc Dis. 2016 Feb;109(2):120-7. doi: 10.1016/j.acvd.2015.11.008. Epub 2016 Feb 2. Review.

PMID: 26850171

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Select item 26782623

 

  1. Three-dimensional echocardiography in congenital heart disease: The next steps.

Simpson JM.

Arch Cardiovasc Dis. 2016 Feb;109(2):81-3. doi: 10.1016/j.acvd.2015.09.010. Epub 2015 Dec 18. No abstract available.

PMID: 26707574

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Select item 26792905

 

  1. Challenges of intra-institutional transfer of care from paediatric to adult congenital cardiology: the need for retention as well as transition.

Bohun CM, Woods P, Winter C, Mitchell J, McLarry J, Weiss J, Broberg CS.

Cardiol Young. 2016 Feb;26(2):327-33. doi: 10.1017/S1047951115000220. Epub 2015 Apr 13.

PMID: 25865899

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Select item 25807884

 

  1. Measuring genetic knowledge: a brief survey instrument for adolescents and adults.

Fitzgerald-Butt SM, Bodine A, Fry KM, Ash J, Zaidi AN, Garg V, Gerhardt CA, McBride KL.

Clin Genet. 2016 Feb;89(2):235-43. doi: 10.1111/cge.12618. Epub 2015 Jun 29.

PMID: 26032340

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Select item 26571439

 

  1. Clinical and psychological characteristics predict future healthcare use in adults with congenital heart disease.

Schoormans D, Sprangers MA, van Melle JP, Pieper PG, van Dijk AP, Sieswerda GT, Hulsbergen-Zwarts MS, Plokker TH, Brunninkhuis LG, Vliegen HW, Mulder BJ.

Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2016 Feb;15(1):72-81. doi: 10.1177/1474515114555819. Epub 2014 Oct 20.

PMID: 25331162

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Select item 26014430

 

  1. A review of the economics of adult congenital heart disease.

Seckeler MD, Thomas ID, Andrews J, Joiner K, Klewer SE.

Expert Rev Pharmacoecon Outcomes Res. 2016 Feb;16(1):85-96. doi: 10.1586/14737167.2016.1140575. Epub 2016 Feb 2.

PMID: 26765559

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Select item 26830357

 

  1. Myocardial deformation parameters predict outcome in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot.

Orwat S, Diller GP, Kempny A, Radke R, Peters B, Kühne T, Boethig D, Gutberlet M, Dubowy KO, Beerbaum P, Sarikouch S, Baumgartner H; German Competence Network for Congenital Heart Defects Investigators.

Heart. 2016 Feb 1;102(3):209-15. doi: 10.1136/heartjnl-2015-308569. Epub 2015 Dec 29.

PMID: 26715570

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Select item 26531781

 

  1. Leukocyte telomere shortening in grown-up patients with congenital heart disease.

Vecoli C, Borghini A, Foffa I, Ait-Ali L, Picano E, Andreassi MG.

Int J Cardiol. 2016 Feb 1;204:17-22. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2015.11.133. Epub 2015 Nov 23.

PMID: 26655528

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Select item 26676105

 

  1. CME Instructions: Clinical applications of radionuclide imaging in the evaluation and management of patients with congenital heart disease.
[No authors listed]

J Nucl Cardiol. 2016 Feb;23(1):42-4. doi: 10.1007/s12350-015-0366-2. No abstract available.

PMID: 26792000

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Select item 26129940

 

  1. Clinical applications of radionuclide imaging in the evaluation and management of patients with congenital heart disease.

Partington SL, Valente AM, Landzberg M, Grant F, Di Carli MF, Dorbala S.

J Nucl Cardiol. 2016 Feb;23(1):45-63. doi: 10.1007/s12350-015-0185-5. Epub 2015 Jul 1.

PMID: 26129940

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Select item 26924901

 

  1. Pregnancy After Cardiac Surgery.

Kanhere AV, Kanhere VM.

J Obstet Gynaecol India. 2016 Feb;66(1):10-5. doi: 10.1007/s13224-016-0841-y. Epub 2016 Feb 8. Review.

PMID: 26924901

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Select item 26555867

 

  1. The extent of the raphe in bicuspid aortic valves is associated with aortic regurgitation and aortic root dilatation.

Koenraadt WM, Grewal N, Gaidoukevitch OY, DeRuiter MC, Gittenberger-de Groot AC, Bartelings MM, Holman ER, Klautz RJ, Schalij MJ, Jongbloed MR.

Neth Heart J. 2016 Feb;24(2):127-33. doi: 10.1007/s12471-015-0784-4.

PMID: 26758507 Free PMC Article

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Select item 26517970

 

  1. Use of Pulmonary Hypertension Medications in Patients with Tetralogy of Fallot with Pulmonary Atresia and Multiple Aortopulmonary Collaterals.

Grant EK, Berger JT.

Pediatr Cardiol. 2016 Feb;37(2):304-12. doi: 10.1007/s00246-015-1278-2. Epub 2015 Oct 28.

PMID: 26511384

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Select item 26499514

 

  1. Exercise Performance in Patients with D-Loop Transposition of the Great Arteries After Arterial Switch Operation: Long-Term Outcomes and Longitudinal Assessment.

Kuebler JD, Chen MH, Alexander ME, Rhodes J.

Pediatr Cardiol. 2016 Feb;37(2):283-9. doi: 10.1007/s00246-015-1275-5. Epub 2015 Oct 6.

PMID: 26439943

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Select item 26424215

 

  1. Provision of Transition Education and Referral Patterns from Pediatric Cardiology to Adult Cardiac Care.

Harbison AL, Grady S Jr, Chi K, Fernandes SM.

Pediatr Cardiol. 2016 Feb;37(2):232-8. doi: 10.1007/s00246-015-1267-5. Epub 2015 Sep 18.

PMID: 26385471

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Select item 26669644

 

  1. Cardiovascular Physiology and Disease in Youth.

Rowland T.

Pediatr Exerc Sci. 2016 Feb;28(1):44-7. doi: 10.1123/pes.2016-0013.

PMID: 26887607

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Select item 26182189

 

  1. A Big Five Personality Typology in Adolescents with Congenital Heart Disease: Prospective Associations with Psychosocial Functioning and Perceived Health.

Rassart J, Luyckx K, Goossens E, Oris L, Apers S, Moons P; i-DETACH investigators.

Int J Behav Med. 2016 Feb 24. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26911460

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Select item 26905694

 

  1. Should People with Patent Foramen Ovale Go to High Altitude? A Case Report of an Alpinist with a Patent Foramen Ovale Exposed to Extreme Altitude.

Kurdziel M, Gierlaszyńska K, Kazik A, Kurek A, Pytel G, Wacławski J, Wasilewski J, Fiszer R, Gadula-Gacek E, Białkowski J, Gąsior M.

High Alt Med Biol. 2016 Feb 22. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

PMID: 26901450

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Select item 26848884

 

  1. Proposal for a national registry to monitor women with Turner syndrome seeking assisted reproductive technology.

Lin AE, Karnis MF, Calderwood L, Crenshaw M, Bhatt A, Souter I, Silberbach M, Reindollar RH.

Fertil Steril. 2016 Feb 13. pii: S0015-0282(16)00083-2. doi: 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2016.01.042. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

PMID: 26878093

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Select item 26922706

 

  1. Myocardial histopathology in late-repaired and unrepaired adults with tetralogy of Fallot.

Pradegan N, Vida VL, Geva T, Stellin G, White MT, Sanders SP, Padera RF.

Cardiovasc Pathol. 2016 Feb 11;25(3):225-231. doi: 10.1016/j.carpath.2016.02.001. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26938796

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Select item 26875011

 

  1. Prognostic value of multiple biomarkers for cardiovascular mortality in adult congenital heart disease: comparisons of single-/two-ventricle physiology, and systemic morphologically right/left ventricles.

Miyamoto K, Takeuchi D, Inai K, Shinohara T, Nakanishi T.

Heart Vessels. 2016 Feb 8. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26857388

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Select item 26847500

 

  1. Fontan circulation causes early, severe liver damage. Should we offer patients a tailored strategy?

Agnoletti G, Ferraro G, Bordese R, Marini D, Gala S, Bergamasco L, Ferroni F, Calvo PL, Barletti C, Cisarò F, Longo F, Napoleone CP.

Int J Cardiol. 2016 Feb 3;209:60-65. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2016.02.041. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26882184

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Select item 26850680

 

  1. Usefulness of Direct Oral Anticoagulants in Adult Congenital Heart Disease.

Pujol C, Niesert AC, Engelhardt A, Schoen P, Kusmenkov E, Pittrow D, Ewert P, Kaemmerer H.

Am J Cardiol. 2016 Feb 1;117(3):450-5. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2015.10.062. Epub 2015 Nov 18.

PMID: 26725103

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Select item 26704031

 

  1. Survival and outcomes of patients with unoperated single ventricle.

Poterucha JT, Anavekar NS, Egbe AC, Julsrud PR, Connolly HM, Ammash NM, Warnes CA.

Heart. 2016 Feb 1;102(3):216-22. doi: 10.1136/heartjnl-2015-308440. Epub 2015 Dec 23.

PMID: 26701967

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Select item 26567230

 

  1. Pregnancy in woman with anatomically correct malposition of the great arteries.

Fallavollita L, Di Gioacchino L, Colaneri M.

Int J Cardiol. 2016 Feb 1;204:126-7. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2015.11.152. Epub 2015 Nov 23. No abstract available.

PMID: 26657605

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Select item 26655546

 

  1. BMPR2 mutations and survival in pulmonary arterial hypertension: an individual participant data meta-analysis.

Evans JD, Girerd B, Montani D, Wang XJ, Galiè N, Austin ED, Elliott G, Asano K, Grünig E, Yan Y, Jing ZC, Manes A, Palazzini M, Wheeler LA, Nakayama I, Satoh T, Eichstaedt C, Hinderhofer K, Wolf M, Rosenzweig EB, Chung WK, Soubrier F, Simonneau G, Sitbon O, Gräf S, Kaptoge S, Di Angelantonio E, Humbert M, Morrell NW.

Lancet Respir Med. 2016 Feb;4(2):129-37. doi: 10.1016/S2213-2600(15)00544-5. Epub 2016 Jan 19.

PMID: 26795434 Free PMC Article

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Select item 26937911

 

  1. Management Options and Outcomes for Neonatal Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome in the Early Twenty-First Century.

Kane JM, Canar J, Kalinowski V, Johnson TJ, Sarah Hoehn K.

Pediatr Cardiol. 2016 Feb;37(2):419-25. doi: 10.1007/s00246-015-1294-2. Epub 2015 Nov 5.

PMID: 26541152

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Select item 26511384

 

  1. Intravenous Hydration for Management of Medication-Resistant Orthostatic Intolerance in the Adolescent and Young Adult.

Moak JP, Leong D, Fabian R, Freedenberg V, Jarosz E, Toney C, Hanumanthaiah S, Darbari A.

Pediatr Cardiol. 2016 Feb;37(2):278-82. doi: 10.1007/s00246-015-1274-6. Epub 2015 Oct 7.

PMID: 26446285

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Select item 26439943

 

ACHD Articles of January 2016

  1. Report from the Japanese Society of Pediatric Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery Research Committee on Cardio-Vascular Function in Adult Patients with Congenital Heart Disease: Mechanism of Aortic Root Dilation and Cardio-Vascular Function in Patients with Tetralogy of Fallot.

Seki M, Kuwata S, Kurishima C, Nakagawa R, Inuzuka R, Sugimoto M, Saiki H, Iwamoto Y, Ishido H, Masutani S, Senzaki H.

Pediatr Int. 2016 Jan 26. doi: 10.1111/ped.12932. [Epub ahead of print] Review.

PMID: 26809655

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Select item 26811383

 

  1. Common long-term complications of adult congenital heart disease: avoid falling in a H.E.A.P.

Ministeri M, Alonso-Gonzalez R, Swan L, Dimopoulos K.

Expert Rev Cardiovasc Ther. 2016 Jan 25:1-18. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26678842

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Select item 26822618

 

  1. Clinical impact of left ventricular eccentricity index using cardiac MRI in assessment of right ventricular hemodynamics and myocardial fibrosis in congenital heart disease.

Yamasaki Y, Nagao M, Kamitani T, Yamanouchi T, Kawanami S, Yamamura K, Sakamoto I, Yabuuchi H, Honda H.

Eur Radiol. 2016 Jan 22. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26795615

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Select item 26799734

 

  1. Double inlet left ventricle with unrestricted pulmonary blood flow and survival into adulthood.

Brida M, Diller GP, Baumgartner H, Orwat S.

Eur Heart J. 2016 Jan 21. pii: ehv752. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

PMID: 26795443

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Select item 26804568

 

  1. Chronic Heart Failure in Congenital Heart Disease: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

Stout KK, Broberg CS, Book WM, Cecchin F, Chen JM, Dimopoulos K, Everitt MD, Gatzoulis M, Harris L, Hsu DT, Kuvin JT, Law Y, Martin CM, Murphy AM, Ross HJ, Singh G, Spray TL.

Circulation. 2016 Jan 19. pii: CIR.0000000000000352. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

PMID: 26787728

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Select item 26783281

 

  1. A cohort study of women with a Fontan circulation undergoing preconception counselling.

Cauldwell M, Von Klemperer K, Uebing A, Swan L, Steer PJ, Babu-Narayan SV, Gatzoulis MA, Johnson MR.

Heart. 2016 Jan 19. pii: heartjnl-2015-308788. doi: 10.1136/heartjnl-2015-308788. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26786817

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Select item 26786543

 

  1. Nationwide Hospitalization Trends in Adult Congenital Heart Disease Across 2003-2012.

Agarwal S, Sud K, Menon V.

J Am Heart Assoc. 2016 Jan 19;5(1). pii: e002330. doi: 10.1161/JAHA.115.002330.

PMID: 26786543 Free Article

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Select item 26781745

 

  1. Treatment of heart failure in adult congenital heart disease: a position paper of the Working Group of Grown-Up Congenital Heart Disease and the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology.

Budts W, Roos-Hesselink J, Rädle-Hurst T, Eicken A, McDonagh TA, Lambrinou E, Crespo-Leiro MG, Walker F, Frogoudaki AA.

Eur Heart J. 2016 Jan 18. pii: ehv741. [Epub ahead of print] Review. No abstract available.

PMID: 26787434

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Select item 26783264

 

  1. The Use of Novel Oral Anticoagulants in Adult Congenital Heart Disease: A Single Center Experience.

Cheng K, Harrogate S, Orchard E.

Am J Cardiol. 2016 Jan 15;117(2):312-3. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2015.11.002. Epub 2015 Nov 11. No abstract available.

PMID: 26679425

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Select item 26782623

 

  1. Heartbeat: Patient-prosthesis mismatch in adults with congenital heart disease.

Otto CM.

Heart. 2016 Jan 15;102(2):87-8. doi: 10.1136/heartjnl-2015-309115. No abstract available.

PMID: 26729605

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Select item 26608652

 

  1. Patient prosthesis mismatch in adult congenital heart disease.

Hernandez-Vaquero D.

Heart. 2016 Jan 15;102(2):89-90. doi: 10.1136/heartjnl-2015-308715. Epub 2015 Nov 25. No abstract available.

PMID: 26608652

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Select item 26596791

 

  1. Aortic valve prosthesis-patient mismatch and exercise capacity in adult patients with congenital heart disease.

van Slooten YJ, van Melle JP, Freling HG, Bouma BJ, van Dijk AP, Jongbloed MR, Post MC, Sieswerda GT, Huis In ‘t Veld A, Ebels T, Voors AA, Pieper PG.

Heart. 2016 Jan 15;102(2):107-13. doi: 10.1136/heartjnl-2015-308013. Epub 2015 Nov 23.

PMID: 26596791

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Select item 26638054

 

  1. Rare copy number variations in an adult with transposition of the great arteries emphasize the importance of updated genetic assessments in syndromic congenital cardiac disease.

Costain G, Roche SL, Scherer SW, Silversides CK, Bassett AS.

Int J Cardiol. 2016 Jan 15;203:516-8. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2015.10.216. Epub 2015 Oct 29. No abstract available.

PMID: 26551885

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Select item 26539961

 

  1. Coronary artery disease in Eisenmenger’s syndrome – Rare but not to be forgotten.

Abraham D, Freeman LJ, Lewis C, O’Sullivan M.

Int J Cardiol. 2016 Jan 15;203:276-7. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2015.10.148. Epub 2015 Oct 19. No abstract available.

PMID: 26519685

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Select item 26519678

 

  1. Determinants of outpatient clinic attendance amongst adults with congenital heart disease and outcome.

Kempny A, Diller GP, Dimopoulos K, Alonso-Gonzalez R, Uebing A, Li W, Babu-Narayan S, Swan L, Wort SJ, Gatzoulis MA.

Int J Cardiol. 2016 Jan 15;203:245-50. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2015.10.081. Epub 2015 Oct 22.

PMID: 26519677

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Select item 26512828

 

  1. Myocardial infarction in grown up patients with congenital heart disease: An emerging high-risk combination.

Sieweke JT, Westhoff-Bleck M, Napp LC, Avsar M, Vogel-Claussen J, Schäfer A, Bauersachs J, Brehm M.

Int J Cardiol. 2016 Jan 15;203:138-40. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2015.10.020. Epub 2015 Oct 9. No abstract available.

PMID: 26512828

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Select item 26512822

 

  1. Diagnostic value of the six-minute walk test (6MWT) in grown-up congenital heart disease (GUCH): Comparison with clinical status and functional exercise capacity.

Kehmeier ES, Sommer MH, Galonska A, Zeus T, Verde P, Kelm M.

Int J Cardiol. 2016 Jan 15;203:90-7. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2015.10.074. Epub 2015 Oct 22.

PMID: 26498869

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Select item 26768435

 

  1. A review of the economics of adult congenital heart disease.

Seckeler MD, Thomas ID, Andrews J, Joiner K, Klewer SE.

Expert Rev Pharmacoecon Outcomes Res. 2016 Jan 14. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26765559

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Select item 26765554

 

  1. Assessment of right ventricular systolic function by echocardiography after surgical repair of congenital heart defects.

Khraiche D, Ben Moussa N.

Arch Cardiovasc Dis. 2016 Jan 13. pii: S1875-2136(15)00217-X. doi: 10.1016/j.acvd.2015.11.002. [Epub ahead of print] Review.

PMID: 26774976

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Select item 26762240

 

  1. Right ventricular longitudinal strain for risk stratification in low-flow, low-gradient aortic stenosis with low ejection fraction.

Dahou A, Clavel MA, Capoulade R, Bartko PE, Magne J, Mundigler G, Bergler-Klein J, Burwash I, Mascherbauer J, Ribeiro HB, O’Connor K, Baumgartner H, Sénéchal M, Dumesnil JG, Rosenhek R, Mathieu P, Larose E, Rodés-Cabau J, Pibarot P.

Heart. 2016 Jan 13. pii: heartjnl-2015-308309. doi: 10.1136/heartjnl-2015-308309. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26762240

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Select item 26764412

 

  1. Exercise echocardiography for structural heart disease.

Izumo M, Akashi YJ.

J Echocardiogr. 2016 Jan 13. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26758899

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Select item 26766307

 

  1. Innovations in telemedicine for cardiovascular care.

Brunetti ND, Scalvini S, Molinari G.

Expert Rev Cardiovasc Ther. 2016 Jan 12. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26759128

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Select item 26765992

 

  1. Pregnancy in women with cardiovascular disease in the guidelines era: an Italian single-center experience.

Santacesaria S, Cataldo S, Annoni GA, Corbella P, Fiocchi S, Vignati GM.

J Cardiovasc Med (Hagerstown). 2016 Jan 12. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26765992

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Select item 26755698

 

  1. Galectin-3 Is Elevated and Associated With Adverse Outcomes in Patients With Single-Ventricle Fontan Circulation.

Opotowsky AR, Baraona F, Owumi J, Loukas B, Singh MN, Valente AM, Wu F, Cheng S, Veldtman G, Rimm EB, Landzberg MJ.

J Am Heart Assoc. 2016 Jan 11;5(1). pii: e002706. doi: 10.1161/JAHA.115.002706.

PMID: 26755550 Free Article

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Select item 26752647

 

  1. [Pathologic markers for evaluation of reversibility in pulmonary hypertension related to congenital heart disease].

Li L, Huang L, Chen G, Huang SA, Liu C, Wang HY, Duan XJ, Wang QZ, Zhao RX, He JG.

Zhonghua Bing Li Xue Za Zhi. 2016 Jan 8;45(1):31-6. doi: 10.3760/cma.j.issn.0529-5807.2016.01.008. Chinese.

PMID: 26791551

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Select item 26576618

 

  1. Three parties, one direction: Research priorities in adults with congenital heart disease. What do professionals, patients and relatives want to know?

Helm PC, Körten MA, Abdul-Khaliq H, Asfour B, Baumgartner H, Breithardt G, Kececioglu D, Schlensak C, Diller GP, Bauer UM.

Int J Cardiol. 2016 Jan 6;207:220-229. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2016.01.027. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26803251

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Select item 26792499

 

  1. Fitness to Fly Testing in Patients with Congenital Heart and Lung Disease.

Spoorenberg ME, van den Oord MH, Meeuwsen T, Takken T.

Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2016;87(1):54-60. doi: 10.3357/AMHP.4408.2016.

PMID: 26735234

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Select item 26734746

 

  1. [Cardiovascular disease in pregnancy].

Hilfiker-Kleiner D, Bauersachs J.

Dtsch Med Wochenschr. 2016 Jan;141(2):110-4. doi: 10.1055/s-0041-110068. Epub 2016 Jan 22. German.

PMID: 26800071

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Select item 26658058

 

  1. 2015 ESC/ERS Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary hypertension: The Joint Task Force for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and the European Respiratory Society (ERS): Endorsed by: Association for European Paediatric and Congenital Cardiology (AEPC), International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT).

Galiè N, Humbert M, Vachiery JL, Gibbs S, Lang I, Torbicki A, Simonneau G, Peacock A, Vonk Noordegraaf A, Beghetti M, Ghofrani A, Gomez Sanchez MA, Hansmann G, Klepetko W, Lancellotti P, Matucci M, McDonagh T, Pierard LA, Trindade PT, Zompatori M, Hoeper M, Aboyans V, Vaz Carneiro A, Achenbach S, Agewall S, Allanore Y, Asteggiano R, Paolo Badano L, Albert Barberà J, Bouvaist H, Bueno H, Byrne RA, Carerj S, Castro G, Erol Ç, Falk V, Funck-Brentano C, Gorenflo M, Granton J, Iung B, Kiely DG, Kirchhof P, Kjellstrom B, Landmesser U, Lekakis J, Lionis C, Lip GY, Orfanos SE, Park MH, Piepoli MF, Ponikowski P, Revel MP, Rigau D, Rosenkranz S, Völler H, Luis Zamorano J.

Eur Heart J. 2016 Jan 1;37(1):67-119. doi: 10.1093/eurheartj/ehv317. Epub 2015 Aug 29. No abstract available.

PMID: 26320113

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Select item 25904767

 

  1. Medical factors that predict quality of life for young adults with congenital heart disease: What matters most?

Jackson JL, Hassen L, Gerardo GM, Vannatta K, Daniels CJ.

Int J Cardiol. 2016 Jan 1;202:804-9. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2015.09.116. Epub 2015 Sep 30.

PMID: 26476036

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Select item 26476030

 

  1. Right heart failure in pregnant women with cyanotic congenital heart disease – The good, the bad and the ugly.

Zengin E, Sinning C, Schrage B, Mueller GC, Klose H, Sachweh J, Goepfert M, Hueneke B, Blankenberg S, Kozlik-Feldmann R.

Int J Cardiol. 2016 Jan 1;202:773-5. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2015.10.036. Epub 2015 Oct 9. No abstract available.

PMID: 26474467

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Select item 26451788

 

  1. Noncompaction with valve abnormalities is rarely associated with neurologic or genetic disease.

Zarrouk-Mahjoub S, Finsterer J.

Int J Cardiol. 2016 Jan 1;202:627-8. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2015.09.066. Epub 2015 Sep 25. No abstract available.

PMID: 26451788

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Select item 26447661

 

  1. Assessment of coagulation profile by thromboelastometry in adult patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease.

Rupa-Matysek J, Trojnarska O, Gil L, Szczepaniak-Chicheł L, Wojtasińska E, Tykarski A, Grajek S, Komarnicki M.

Int J Cardiol. 2016 Jan 1;202:556-60. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2015.09.082. Epub 2015 Oct 6.

PMID: 26447661

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Select item 26443939

 

  1. Fellows’ perspectives on training in adult congenital heart disease: Results of a survey from the International Society for Adult Congenital Heart Disease (ISACHD).

Bokma JP, Burchill LJ, Kovacs AH, Oechslin EN, Khairy P, Mulder BJ, Veldtman GR.

Int J Cardiol. 2016 Jan 1;202:253-5. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2015.08.127. Epub 2015 Sep 14. No abstract available.

PMID: 26407046

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Select item 26402453

 

  1. Release of growth-differentiation factor 15 and associations with cardiac function in adult patients with congenital heart disease.

Eindhoven JA, van den Bosch AE, Oemrawsingh RM, Baggen VJ, Kardys I, Cuypers JA, Witsenburg M, van Schaik RH, Roos-Hesselink JW, Boersma E.

Int J Cardiol. 2016 Jan 1;202:246-51. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2015.09.010. Epub 2015 Sep 14.

PMID: 26402453

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Select item 26386931

 

  1. Radiologic evaluation of coronary artery disease in adults with congenital heart disease.

Valenzuela DM, Ordovas KG.

Int J Cardiovasc Imaging. 2016 Jan;32(1):13-8. doi: 10.1007/s10554-015-0760-5. Epub 2015 Sep 5.

PMID: 26342712

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Select item 26531318

 

  1. Coarctation of the aorta in adolescents and adults: A review of clinical features and CT imaging.

Nance JW, Ringel RE, Fishman EK.

J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr. 2016 Jan-Feb;10(1):1-12. doi: 10.1016/j.jcct.2015.11.002. Epub 2015 Nov 19. Review.

PMID: 26639936

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  1. Utility of three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography for diagnosis of unroofed coronary sinus.

Kawamukai M, Muranaka A, Yuda S, Sato Y, Makiguchi N, Tachibana K, Hatakeyama K, Takagi N, Higami T, Miura T.

J Med Ultrason (2001). 2016 Jan;43(1):91-4. doi: 10.1007/s10396-015-0648-y. Epub 2015 Jul 7.

PMID: 26703172

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  1. Reproductive Health and Women With Congenital Heart Disease: A Practice Update.

Osteen KA, Beal CC.

J Perinat Neonatal Nurs. 2016 Jan-Mar;30(1):25-35. doi: 10.1097/JPN.0000000000000144.

PMID: 26565962

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  1. Is Biventricular Fibrosis the Mediator of Late Complications in Tetralogy of Fallot?

Zile MR, Gregg D.

JACC Cardiovasc Imaging. 2016 Jan;9(1):11-3. doi: 10.1016/j.jcmg.2015.08.017. Epub 2015 Dec 9. No abstract available.

PMID: 26684974

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  1. Possible Common Aetiology behind Maternal Preeclampsia and Congenital Heart Defects in the Child: a Cardiovascular Diseases in Norway Project Study.

Brodwall K, Leirgul E, Greve G, Vollset SE, Holmstrøm H, Tell GS, Øyen N.

Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2016 Jan;30(1):76-85. doi: 10.1111/ppe.12252. Epub 2015 Oct 19.

PMID: 26479038

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  1. Clinical Application of Superior Vena Cava Spectra in Evaluation of Pulmonary Hypertension: A Comparative Echocardiography and Catheterization Study.

Hou Y, Sun DD, Yuan LJ, Zhu XY, Shang FJ, Hou CJ, Duan YY.

Ultrasound Med Biol. 2016 Jan;42(1):110-7. doi: 10.1016/j.ultrasmedbio.2015.07.029. Epub 2015 Oct 23.

PMID: 26478279

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43.Exercise at the Extremes: The Amount of Exercise to Reduce Cardiovascular Events.

Eijsvogels TM, Molossi S, Lee DC, Emery MS, Thompson PD.

J Am Coll Cardiol. 2016 Jan 26;67(3):316-29. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2015.11.034. Review.

PMID: 26796398

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  1. Novel homozygous BMP9 nonsense mutation causes pulmonary arterial hypertension: a case report.

Wang G, Fan R, Ji R, Zou W, Penny DJ, Varghese NP, Fan Y.

BMC Pulm Med. 2016 Jan 22;16(1):17. doi: 10.1186/s12890-016-0183-7.

PMID: 26801773 Free PMC Article

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  1. Variable severity of cardiovascular phenotypes in patients with an early-onset form of Marfan syndrome harboring FBN1 mutations in exons 24-32.

Maeda J, Kosaki K, Shiono J, Kouno K, Aeba R, Yamagishi H.

Heart Vessels. 2016 Jan 21. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26796135

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  1. Increased myocardial native T1 and extracellular volume in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

Soslow JH, Damon SM, Crum K, Lawson MA, Slaughter JC, Xu M, Arai AE, Sawyer DB, Parra DA, Damon BM, Markham LW.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson. 2016 Jan 21;18(1):5. doi: 10.1186/s12968-016-0224-7.

PMID: 26795569 Free PMC Article

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  1. Altered Cholesterol Metabolism and Hypocholesterolemia in Patients with Single Ventricle following Fontan Palliation.

Whiteside W, Tan M, Ostlund RE Jr, Yu S, Ma L, Rocchini A.

J Pediatr. 2016 Jan 21. pii: S0022-3476(15)01626-1. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2015.12.038. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26806364

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  1. Analysis of right ventricle function with strain imaging before and after pulmonary valve replacement.

Gursu HA, Varan B, Sade E, Erdogan I, Ozkan M.

Cardiol J. 2016 Jan 18. doi: 10.5603/CJ.a2016.0007. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26779972 Free Article

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  1. BMPR2 mutations and survival in pulmonary arterial hypertension: an individual participant data meta-analysis.

Evans JD, Girerd B, Montani D, Wang XJ, Galiè N, Austin ED, Elliott G, Asano K, Grünig E, Yan Y, Jing ZC, Manes A, Palazzini M, Wheeler LA, Nakayama I, Satoh T, Eichstaedt C, Hinderhofer K, Wolf M, Rosenzweig EB, Chung WK, Soubrier F, Simonneau G, Sitbon O, Gräf S, Kaptoge S, Di Angelantonio E, Humbert M, Morrell NW.

Lancet Respir Med. 2016 Jan 18. pii: S2213-2600(15)00544-5. doi: 10.1016/S2213-2600(15)00544-5. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26795434 Free Article

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  1. Quantitative assessment of systolic left ventricular function with speckle-tracking echocardiography in adult patients with repaired aortic coarctation.

Menting ME, van Grootel RW, van den Bosch AE, Eindhoven JA, McGhie JS, Cuypers JA, Witsenburg M, Helbing WA, Roos-Hesselink JW.

Int J Cardiovasc Imaging. 2016 Jan 16. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26780661

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  1. Differential Impact of Pulmonary Regurgitation on Patients With Surgically Repaired Pulmonary Stenosis Versus Tetralogy of Fallot.

Joynt MR, Yu S, Dorfman AL, Ghadimi Mahani M, Agarwal PP, Lu JC.

Am J Cardiol. 2016 Jan 15;117(2):289-94. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2015.10.025. Epub 2015 Nov 5.

PMID: 26651611

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  1. Long-term course of a patient with congenital corrected transposition of the great arteries and dextrocardia – The Fisher King.

Sinning C, Kozlik-Feldmann R, Demir C, Blankenberg S, Zengin E.

Int J Cardiol. 2016 Jan 15;203:436-7. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2015.10.190. Epub 2015 Oct 28. No abstract available.

PMID: 26547729

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  1. Upcoming Events in Pediatric Cardiology.
[No authors listed]

Pediatr Cardiol. 2016 Jan 13. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

PMID: 26762385

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  1. Long-Term Serial Follow-Up of Pulmonary Artery Size and Wall Shear Stress in Fontan Patients.

Bossers SS, Cibis M, Kapusta L, Potters WV, Snoeren MM, Wentzel JJ, Moelker A, Helbing WA.

Pediatr Cardiol. 2016 Jan 12. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26757738

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  1. Semiautomatic Evaluation of Tricuspid Annular Plane Systolic Excursion from Two Dimensional Echocardiographic Images.

Ramamurthy S, Kelleman MS, McGaughy F, Sachdeva R.

Echocardiography. 2016 Jan 11. doi: 10.1111/echo.13166. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26751037

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  1. Bileaflet Mitral Valve Prolapse and Risk of Ventricular Dysrhythmias and Death.

Nordhues BD, Siontis KC, Scott CG, Nkomo VT, Ackerman MJ, Asirvatham SJ, Noseworthy PA.

J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol. 2016 Jan 9. doi: 10.1111/jce.12914. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26749260

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  1. Assessment of intracardiac flow and vorticity in the right heart of patients after repair of tetralogy of Fallot by flow-sensitive 4D MRI.

Hirtler D, Garcia J, Barker AJ, Geiger J.

Eur Radiol. 2016 Jan 8. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26747260

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  1. Recent Clinical Drug Trials Evidence in Marfan Syndrome and Clinical Implications.

Singh MN, Lacro RV.

Can J Cardiol. 2016 Jan;32(1):66-77. doi: 10.1016/j.cjca.2015.11.003. Epub 2015 Nov 10. Review.

PMID: 26724512

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  1. A Decade of Discovery in the Genetic Understanding of Thoracic Aortic Disease.

Andelfinger G, Loeys B, Dietz H.

Can J Cardiol. 2016 Jan;32(1):13-25. doi: 10.1016/j.cjca.2015.10.017. Epub 2015 Oct 26. Review.

PMID: 26724507

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  1. Fontan-associated liver disease: Implications for heart transplantation.

Greenway SC, Crossland DS, Hudson M, Martin SR, Myers RP, Prieur T, Hasan A, Kirk R.

J Heart Lung Transplant. 2016 Jan;35(1):26-33. doi: 10.1016/j.healun.2015.10.015. Epub 2015 Oct 19.

PMID: 26586487

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  1. Endurance Training on Congenital Valvular Regurgitation: An Athlete Case Series.

Hoyt WJ Jr, Dean PN, John AS, Gimple LW, Mistry DJ, Battle RW.

Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2016 Jan;48(1):16-9. doi: 10.1249/MSS.0000000000000743.

PMID: 26225768

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