ACHD Featured Articles of August 2015

1. Long-Term Outcome of Mustard/Senning Correction for Transposition of the Great Arteries in Sweden and Denmark.

Vejlstrup N, Sørensen K, Mattsson E, Thilén U, Kvidal P, Johansson B, Iversen K, Søndergaard L, Dellborg M, Eriksson P.

Circulation. 2015 Aug 25;132(8):633-8. doi: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.114.010770. Epub 2015 Jul 16.

PMID: 26185211

Moe_Tabitha-WEBMehul Patel photoComment from Drs. Tabitha Moe (Phoenix) and Mehul Patel (Grand Rapids, MI) section editors of Adult Congenital Heart Journal WatchThe group from Denmark and Sweden continues to impress with this excellent long-term follow up data on the largest study of survival after the atrial switch operation for transposition of the great arteries. The atrial baffle operation, for transposition of the great arteries was introduced in the 1950’s, and continued to be in use until the arterial switch operation became the standard of care in the early 1990’s.  This interesting cohort of patients is now squarely in the adult age range. They were able to identify 468 patients and of those there was a 20% 30-day mortality, and 60% were still alive after 30 years of follow-up.  Most notably sinus nodal dysfunction, which necessitates pacemaker placement, is associated with an increase in mortality.  Long-term atrial baffle survivors provide important insight into the outcomes of systemic morphologic right ventricle patients. All patients who underwent atrial baffle from 1967-2003 were identified, 6 total centers. Patients who required a Rastelli, were a DORV, or univentricular heart were excluded. Pacemaker was required in 15% of patients at 30 years.  39% of the patients died or underwent a heart transplant. The incidence of TGA is 312 per million which extrapolates to 1900 patients during the study period. Only 468 patients had an atrial baffle procedure, and a very small number had ASO in the late 1990’s. A less-than-perfect atrial baffle does not inherently damage the RV but may lead to baffle revision or reconstruction. The authors made it quite clear that several factors normally considered important such as (operation type [Mustard versus Senning], age at operation, institution where the operation was performed, operation early or late in the era, associated defects such as VSD and LVOTO) are not statistically significantly associated with long-term survival. It is excellent to appreciate the good long-term survival curves in our aging Mustard-Senning population.

Take home points:  

  1. Perioperative factors during atrial switch do not influence long-term survival.
  2. Implantation of a pacemaker, which was required in 15% over 30 years, was the only factor identified to have an adverse effect on long-term mortality.

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2. Medical and Obstetric Outcomes Among Pregnant Women With Congenital Heart Disease.

Thompson JL, Kuklina EV, Bateman BT, Callaghan WM, James AH, Grotegut CA.

Obstet Gynecol. 2015 Aug;126(2):346-54. doi: 10.1097/AOG.0000000000000973.

PMID: 26241425

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Select item 26008762

Comment from Drs. Tabitha Moe (Phoenix) and Mehul Patel (Grand Rapids, MI) section editors of Adult Congenital Heart Journal WatchThis trial was designed to determine whether or not women with congenital heart disease are more likely to have medical or obstetric complications.  From 2000 to 2010 there was a significant linear increase in the prevalence of CHD to 9.0 per 10,000 delivery hospitalizations.  A composite negative cardiovascular outcome is more likely to occur among delivery hospitalizations with maternal CHD than in women without.  The number of delivery hospitalizations with maternal CHD in the US is increasing, and it remains unclear whether the correction of the lesion affected the outcomes.  Each of these hospitalizations has a high burden of medical and obstetric complications. In 2005 is was estimated that there were 1 million adults living in the US with CHD, which continues to increase at a rate of 5% per year, which leads us to more women with CHD surviving to childbearing age. White race is more prevalent among women with CHD delivery hospitalizations.  Hospitalizations with CHD had a trend towards a longer hospital stay.  The most commonly coded congenital heart lesions were ASD, VSD, and left-sided congenital valvular lesions.  15% of delivery hospitalizations with CHD had a nonspecific code for CHD.  There were no documented deliveries documented with HLHS.  Delivery hospitalizations with CHD represented 0.085% of all deliveries from 2008 to 2010, but represent 2.0% of all in-hospital deaths. In-hospital mortality, medical cardiovascular complications including myocardial infarction, cardiac arrest, arrhythmia, heart failure, and stroke as well as obstetric complications are more likely to take place among delivery hospitalizations with CHD in comparison with delivery hospitalizations without CHD. It is unfortunate that the true incidence of maternal death defined as deaths from pregnancy complications occurring during pregnancy or within 42 days of delivery remains largely unknown. Although this data is not new, or a departure from previously published data including the ROPAC data it is simply further evidence of the way in which we should be counseling our CHD patients regarding pregnancy risks during prenatal visits.

Take home points:

  1. There is a significant linear increase in the prevalence of deliveries complicated by CHD in the US.
  2. It is unfortunate that the true incidence of maternal death defined as deaths from pregnancy complications occurring during pregnancy or within 42 days of delivery remains largely unknown.

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3. Contraceptive Use and Unintended Pregnancy in Women With Congenital Heart Disease.

Lindley KJ, Madden T, Cahill AG, Ludbrook PA, Billadello JJ.

Obstet Gynecol. 2015 Aug;126(2):363-9. doi: 10.1097/AOG.0000000000000911.

PMID: 26241427

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Select item 26241425

Comment from Drs. Tabitha Moe (Phoenix) and Mehul Patel (Grand Rapids, MI) section editors of Adult Congenital Heart Journal WatchThis is an excellent review of the patterns of behavior for prescribing and counseling regarding contraception in patients with congenital heart disease.  This is specifically a review of prescribing behaviors in an ACHD center.  This is a small study, only reviewing 100 women of childbearing age.  63 of whom reported using any contraceptive method whatsoever.  30 reported utilizing a method with a failure rate of <1% per year, which would include Depo-Provera, oral combination hormonal cyclic contraception, intra-uterine device, or hormonal patch or ring. 20 of the women documented using a method with much higher failure rates in the 6-12% per year range, which would likely be condoms.  9 of which utilized long-acting reversible contraception.  64 of 141 total pregnancies reported were unexpected.  Only 1 pregnancy occurred with a tier I method of contraception.  The high incidence of unintended pregnancy in this group may be related to underuse of highly effective methods of contraception.  Specific counseling on tier I methods of contraception may be able to reduce unintended pregnancies in women with congenital heart disease.  Tier III contraception includes condoms, withdrawal, rhythm method, sponge, spermicide, and fertility awareness, associated with failure rates of up to 18-28% per year.  On average 85% of women are able to become pregnant within one year without contraception. The majority of women with congenital heart disease are sexually active, and an exceptional minority utilize Tier I methods of contraception.  These US results are the first reported, that support the previously documented findings from prior European studies.  It is imperative that all women with CHD receive counseling regarding the risks of pregnancy morbidity and mortality.  As well all women need lesion/palliation appropriate counseling regarding the use of contraception, including the specific use of estrogen containing contraception if appropriate. Many patients with congenital heart disease have relative or absolute contraindications to pregnancy including pulmonary hypertension, heart failure, mechanical valve heart disease, and chronic use of teratogenic medical therapy.  It is crucial that our patients, and their partners receive aggressive counseling and education regarding their risks of pregnancy additionally their risks of post-partum progression of disease and ability to care for or contribute to the care of children for their lifetime.

Take home points:

  1. Contraception counseling and pregnancy planning remains a very important aspect of adult congenital care.
  2. It is crucial to have this discussion as a team with the patient and partner.
  3. It is unfortunate that only an exceptional minority utilize Tier I methods of contraception.

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4. Secundum atrial septal defect is associated with reduced survival in adult men.

Kuijpers JM, van der Bom T, van Riel AC, Meijboom FJ, van Dijk AP, Pieper PG, Vliegen HW, Waskowsky WM, Oomen T, Zomer AC, Wagenaar LJ, Heesen WF, Roos-Hesselink JW, Zwinderman AH, Mulder BJ, Bouma BJ.

Eur Heart J. 2015 Aug 14;36(31):2079-2086. Epub 2015 Apr 16.

PMID: 25883174

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Comment from Drs. Tabitha Moe (Phoenix) and Mehul Patel (Grand Rapids, MI) section editors of Adult Congenital Heart Journal WatchThis is an excellent discussion presented by the Dutch research group interestingly adult men with a secundum type atrial septal defect have a worse survival expectancy than a gender-matched cohort from the general population. Male patients are also at higher risk of acquiring additional morbidities during adult life.  The significance of gender disparity may warrant gender-specific guidelines for the long-term management of these patients. The CONCOR registry delivers again on another excellent dataset analysis.  Survival of female patients with secundum-type atrial septal defect is comparable to other women in the population without an ASD.  The dysrhythmias and conduction disturbances occurred beginning at a young age, and affect a large proportion of patients during their lifetime.  The incidence of pulmonary hypertension, and congestive heart failure begin to increase at age 35 and increase progressively with age. They evaluated 1088 total patients, the ratio of men to women is 362 in men, and 726 women (1:2). Nearly 97% of the lesions were closed surgically prior to the year 2000.  The average age at surgical repair was 10 years of age.  The overall high morbidity of ASD2 (secundum ASD) patients necessitates appropriate surveillance and screening. The effect of gender on both mortality and morbidity was not confounded by closure status.  Men are at higher risk for SVTs, conduction disturbances, cerebrovascular thromboembolism, HF and have reduced survival than women.  Although the incidence of PAH is higher in women, mortality due to PAH is higher in men.

Take home points:

  1. Men are at higher risk for SVTs, conduction disturbances, cerebrovascular thromboembolism, HF and have reduced survival than women with ostium secundum ASD regardless of the closure status.
  2. Although the incidence of PAH is higher in women, mortality due to PAH is higher in men.

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5. Combining bosentan and sildenafil in pulmonary arterial hypertension patients failing monotherapy: real-world insights.

Dardi F, Manes A, Palazzini M, Bachetti C, Mazzanti G, Rinaldi A, Albini A, Gotti E, Monti E, Bacchi Reggiani ML, Galiè N.

Eur Respir J. 2015 Aug;46(2):414-21. doi: 10.1183/09031936.00209914. Epub 2015 May 28.

PMID: 26022952

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Comment from Drs. Tabitha Moe (Phoenix) and Mehul Patel (Grand Rapids, MI) section editors of Adult Congenital Heart Journal WatchPulmonary arterial hypertension is a severe disease with a complex pathogenesis, for which combination therapy is an attractive option.  This trial aimed to evaluate the impact of sequential combination therapy on both short-term responses and long-term outcomes in a real world setting. Patients with all cause PAH including CHD who were not meeting treatment goals on either first line bosentan or sildenafil monotherapy were given the addition of sildenafil or bosentan and then reassessed in 3-4 months.  The overall survival estimates were 91% at 1 year and 59% at 5 years. There was documentation of significant short-term clinical and hemodynamic improvement in patients on dual therapy who fail monotherapy in a real world setting regardless of the etiology.

Take home points:

  1. There is significant short-term clinical and hemodynamic improvement in patients on dual therapy for PAH using Bosentan and Sildenafil who fail monotherapy in a real world setting regardless of the etiology.

 

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ACHD Articles of August 2015

  1. 2015 ESC/ERS Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary hypertension: The Joint Task Force for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and the European Respiratory Society (ERS)Endorsed by: Association for European Paediatric and Congenital Cardiology (AEPC), International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT).

Authors/Task Force Members:, Galiè N, Humbert M, Vachiery JL, Gibbs S, Lang I, Torbicki A, Simonneau G, Peacock A, Vonk Noordegraaf A, Beghetti M, Ghofrani A, Gomez Sanchez MA, Hansmann G, Klepetko W, Lancellotti P, Matucci M, McDonagh T, Pierard LA, Trindade PT, Zompatori M, Hoeper M; Authors/Task Force Members.

Eur Heart J. 2015 Aug 29. pii: ehv317. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

PMID: 26320113

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  1. 2015 ESC Guidelines for the management of infective endocarditis: The Task Force for the Management of Infective Endocarditis of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC)Endorsed by: European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (EACTS), the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM).

Authors/Task Force Members, Habib G, Lancellotti P, Antunes MJ, Bongiorni MG, Casalta JP, Del Zotti F, Dulgheru R, El Khoury G, Erba PA, Iung B, Miro JM, Mulder BJ, Plonska-Gosciniak E, Price S, Roos-Hesselink J, Snygg-Martin U, Thuny F, Tornos Mas P, Vilacosta I, Zamorano JL.

Eur Heart J. 2015 Aug 29. pii: ehv319. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

PMID: 26320109

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  1. Semiautomatic three-dimensional CT ventricular volumetry in patients with congenital heart disease: agreement between two methods with different user interaction.

Goo HW, Park SH.

Int J Cardiovasc Imaging. 2015 Aug 29. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26319216

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  1. Strategies for thromboprophylaxis in Fontan circulation: a meta-analysis.

Alsaied T, Alsidawi S, Allen CC, Faircloth J, Palumbo JS, Veldtman GR.

Heart. 2015 Aug 28. pii: heartjnl-2015-307930. doi: 10.1136/heartjnl-2015-307930. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26319122

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  1. Depression requiring anti-depressant drug therapy in adult congenital heart disease: prevalence, risk factors, and prognostic value.

Diller GP, Bräutigam A, Kempny A, Uebing A, Alonso-Gonzalez R, Swan L, Babu-Narayan SV, Baumgartner H, Dimopoulos K, Gatzoulis MA.

Eur Heart J. 2015 Aug 27. pii: ehv386. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26314687

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  1. Towards Safer Pregnancies in Women With Congenital Heart Disease - Reply.

Lu CW, Wu MH.

Circ J. 2015 Aug 25;79(9):2076-7. doi: 10.1253/circj.CJ-15-0843. Epub 2015 Aug 7. No abstract available.

PMID: 26255615 Free Article

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  1. Towards Safer Pregnancies in Women With Congenital Heart Disease.

Balci A, Roos-Hesselink JW, Pieper PG.

Circ J. 2015 Aug 25;79(9):2075. doi: 10.1253/circj.CJ-15-0609. Epub 2015 Aug 7. No abstract available.

PMID: 26255613 Free Article

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Select item 26304667

 

  1. Turner’s syndrome: is there a risk of widespread vascular abnormalities?

Gaertner S, Jeandidier N, Glasser L, Ohl J, Trinh A, Stephan D.

Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2015 Aug 25. doi: 10.1111/cen.12885. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26303995

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  1. Multimodality Evaluation of the Right Ventricle: An Updated Review.

Tadic M.

Clin Cardiol. 2015 Aug 20. doi: 10.1002/clc.22443. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26289321

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  1. Adolescents With Congenital Heart Disease and Their Parents: Needs Before Transfer to Adult Care.

Burström Å, Öjmyr-Joelsson M, Bratt EL, Lundell B, Nisell M.

J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2015 Aug 20. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26296247

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Select item 26289423

 

  1. Assessment of Transition Readiness in Adolescents and Young Adults with Heart Disease.

Uzark K, Smith C, Donohue J, Yu S, Afton K, Norris M, Cotts T.

J Pediatr. 2015 Aug 19. pii: S0022-3476(15)00821-5. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2015.07.043. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26298627

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  1. Riociguat for pulmonary hypertension in congenital heart disease: opportunities and challenges.

Lammers AE, Diller GP.

Heart. 2015 Aug 18. pii: heartjnl-2015-308245. doi: 10.1136/heartjnl-2015-308245. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

PMID: 26285600

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Select item 26313872

 

  1. Long-term challenges in congenital heart disease.

Bernstein D.

Curr Opin Pediatr. 2015 Aug 14. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

PMID: 26281037

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Select item 26281035

 

  1. Secundum atrial septal defect is associated with reduced survival in adult men.

Kuijpers JM, van der Bom T, van Riel AC, Meijboom FJ, van Dijk AP, Pieper PG, Vliegen HW, Waskowsky WM, Oomen T, Zomer AC, Wagenaar LJ, Heesen WF, Roos-Hesselink JW, Zwinderman AH, Mulder BJ, Bouma BJ.

Eur Heart J. 2015 Aug 14;36(31):2079-2086. Epub 2015 Apr 16.

PMID: 25883174

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Select item 26271472

 

  1. The effect of resolution on viscous dissipation measured with 4D flow MRI in patients with Fontan circulation: Evaluation using computational fluid dynamics.

Cibis M, Jarvis K, Markl M, Rose M, Rigsby C, Barker AJ, Wentzel JJ.

J Biomech. 2015 Aug 12:BMD1500331. doi: 10.1016/j.jbiomech.2015.07.039. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26298492

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Select item 26265074

 

  1. Atrial septal defect and training-induced changes in loading conditions: clinical management and implications for competitive athletes.

D’Ascenzi F, Malandrino A, Bonifazi M, Mondillo S.

BMJ Case Rep. 2015 Aug 11;2015. pii: bcr2015211119. doi: 10.1136/bcr-2015-211119.

PMID: 26265074

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Select item 26265630

 

  1. Task Force 6: Pediatric Cardiology Fellowship Training in Adult Congenital Heart Disease.

Stout K, Valente AM, Bartz PJ, Cook S, Gurvitz M, Saidi A, Ross RD.

Circulation. 2015 Aug 11;132(6):e91-8. doi: 10.1161/CIR.0000000000000197. Epub 2015 Mar 13. No abstract available.

PMID: 25769638

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Select item 26301646

 

  1. An unusual case of left ventricle noncompaction.

Parato VM, Scarano M.

Int J Cardiol. 2015 Aug 11;201:243-244. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2015.08.078. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

PMID: 26301646

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Select item 25777632

 

  1. Task Force 6: Pediatric Cardiology Fellowship Training in Adult Congenital Heart Disease.

Stout K, Valente AM, Bartz PJ, Cook S, Gurvitz M, Saidi A, Ross RD.

J Am Coll Cardiol. 2015 Aug 11;66(6):723-31. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2015.03.011. Epub 2015 Mar 13. No abstract available.

PMID: 25777632

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Select item 26260617

 

  1. Adults with congenital heart disease transition.

Niwa K.

Curr Opin Pediatr. 2015 Aug 8. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26262578

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Select item 26263841

 

  1. Contraception Practices and Pregnancy Outcome in Patients after Fontan Operation.

Pundi KN, Pundi K, Johnson JN, Dearani JA, Bonnichsen CR, Phillips SD, Canobbio MC, Driscoll DJ, Cetta F.

Congenit Heart Dis. 2015 Aug 4. doi: 10.1111/chd.12291. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26239864

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Select item 26239748

 

  1. Feasibility of Using Electronic Medical Record Data for Tracking Quality Indicators in Adults with Congenital Heart Disease.

Broberg C, Sklenar J, Burchill L, Daniels C, Marelli A, Gurvitz M.

Congenit Heart Dis. 2015 Aug 4. doi: 10.1111/chd.12289. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26239748

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Select item 26245628

 

  1. Anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary trunk.

Wu WH, Sun JP, Ma L, Xie XY, Yang XS, Yu CM.

Int J Cardiol. 2015 Aug 4;201:165-167. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2015.08.041. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

PMID: 26298368

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Select item 26227197

 

  1. Isolated Noncompaction of the Left Ventricle in Adults.

Hussein A, Karimianpour A, Collier P, Krasuski RA.

J Am Coll Cardiol. 2015 Aug 4;66(5):578-85. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2015.06.017. Review.

PMID: 26227197

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Select item 26235940

 

  1. Implementation of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association 2008 Guidelines for the Management of Adults With Congenital Heart Disease.

Goossens E, Fernandes SM, Landzberg MJ, Moons P.

Am J Cardiol. 2015 Aug 1;116(3):452-7. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2015.04.041. Epub 2015 May 9.

PMID: 26092269

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Select item 26059869

 

  1. Impact of Heart Disease on Maternal and Fetal Outcomes in Pregnant Women.

Koutrolou-Sotiropoulou P, Parikh PB, Miller C, Lima FV, Butler J, Stergiopoulos K.

Am J Cardiol. 2015 Aug 1;116(3):474-80. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2015.04.063. Epub 2015 May 9.

PMID: 26059869

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Select item 25931334

 

  1. MRI-based Protocol to Characterize the Relationship Between Bicuspid Aortic Valve Morphology and Hemodynamics.

Mirabella L, Barker AJ, Saikrishnan N, Coco ER, Mangiameli DJ, Markl M, Yoganathan AP.

Ann Biomed Eng. 2015 Aug;43(8):1815-27. doi: 10.1007/s10439-014-1214-2. Epub 2014 Dec 23.

PMID: 25533768

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Select item 26141773

 

  1. Follow-up of congenital heart disease patients with subclinical hypothyroidism.

Martínez-Quintana E, Rodríguez-González F.

Cardiol Young. 2015 Aug;25(6):1111-8. doi: 10.1017/S1047951114001711. Epub 2014 Sep 23.

PMID: 25247450

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Select item 25247327

 

  1. Combining bosentan and sildenafil in pulmonary arterial hypertension patients failing monotherapy: real-world insights.

Dardi F, Manes A, Palazzini M, Bachetti C, Mazzanti G, Rinaldi A, Albini A, Gotti E, Monti E, Bacchi Reggiani ML, Galiè N.

Eur Respir J. 2015 Aug;46(2):414-21. doi: 10.1183/09031936.00209914. Epub 2015 May 28.

PMID: 26022952

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Select item 25810155

 

  1. Late outcomes in adults with coarctation of the aorta.

Choudhary P, Canniffe C, Jackson DJ, Tanous D, Walsh K, Celermajer DS.

Heart. 2015 Aug 1;101(15):1190-5. doi: 10.1136/heartjnl-2014-307035. Epub 2015 Mar 25.

PMID: 25810155

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Select item 25911146

 

  1. Should We Recommend Exercise after the Fontan Procedure?

Sutherland N, Jones B, d’Udekem Y.

Heart Lung Circ. 2015 Aug;24(8):753-68. doi: 10.1016/j.hlc.2015.03.005. Epub 2015 Mar 24. Review.

PMID: 25911145

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Select item 25981146

 

  1. Utility of a Single 3-Vessel View in the Evaluation of the Ventricular Outflow Tracts.

Brandt JS, Wang E, Rychik J, Soffer D, McCann ML, Schwartz N.

J Ultrasound Med. 2015 Aug;34(8):1415-21. doi: 10.7863/ultra.34.8.1415.

PMID: 26206827

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Select item 26290840

 

  1. Contraceptive Use and Unintended Pregnancy in Women With Congenital Heart Disease.

Lindley KJ, Madden T, Cahill AG, Ludbrook PA, Billadello JJ.

Obstet Gynecol. 2015 Aug;126(2):363-9. doi: 10.1097/AOG.0000000000000911.

PMID: 26241427

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Select item 26241425

 

  1. Medical and Obstetric Outcomes Among Pregnant Women With Congenital Heart Disease.

Thompson JL, Kuklina EV, Bateman BT, Callaghan WM, James AH, Grotegut CA.

Obstet Gynecol. 2015 Aug;126(2):346-54. doi: 10.1097/AOG.0000000000000973.

PMID: 26241425

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Select item 26008762

 

  1. Strategies for thromboprophylaxis in Fontan circulation: a meta-analysis.

Alsaied T, Alsidawi S, Allen CC, Faircloth J, Palumbo JS, Veldtman GR.

Heart. 2015 Aug 28. pii: heartjnl-2015-307930. doi: 10.1136/heartjnl-2015-307930. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26319122

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Select item 26315498

 

  1. Atenolol vs enalapril in young hypertensive patients after successful repair of aortic coarctation.

Di Salvo G, Castaldi B, Gala S, Baldini L, Del Gaizo F, D’Aiello FA, Mormile A, Rea A, Scognamiglio G, Pacileo G, Keating S, Fadel BM, Berrino L, Perna A, Russo MG, Calabrò R.

J Hum Hypertens. 2015 Aug 20. doi: 10.1038/jhh.2015.87. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26290275

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Select item 26289392

 

  1. Obese Nondiabetic Pregnancies and High Maternal Glycated Hemoglobin at Delivery as an Indicator of Offspring and Maternal Postpartum Risk: The Prospective PEACHES Mother-Child Cohort.

Ensenauer R, Brandlhuber L, Burgmann M, Sobotzki C, Zwafink C, Anzill S, Holdt L, Teupser D, Hasbargen U, Netz H, Roscher AA, von Kries R.

Clin Chem. 2015 Aug 11. pii: clinchem.2015.242206. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26265704

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Select item 25777654

 

  1. Safety of Magnetic Resonance Imaging After Implantation of Stainless Steel Embolization Coils.

Slesnick TC, Schreier J, Soriano BD, Kutty S, Nutting AC, Kim DW, Powell AJ, Valente AM.

Pediatr Cardiol. 2015 Aug 11. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26260092

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Select item 26296072

 

  1. Chronic transfusion therapy improves but does not normalize systemic and pulmonary vasculopathy in sickle cell disease.

Detterich JA, Kato RM, Rabai M, Meiselman HJ, Coates TD, Wood JC.

Blood. 2015 Aug 6;126(6):703-10. doi: 10.1182/blood-2014-12-614370. Epub 2015 Jun 2.

PMID: 26036801

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Select item 26248130

 

  1. Main pulmonary artery area limits exercise capacity in patients long-term after arterial switch operation.

Baggen VJ, Driessen MM, Meijboom FJ, Sieswerda GT, Jansen NJ, van Wijk SW, Doevendans PA, Leiner T, Schoof PH, Takken T, Breur JM.

J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2015 Aug 6. pii: S0022-5223(15)01321-5. doi: 10.1016/j.jtcvs.2015.07.101. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 26318354

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Select item 26314851

 

  1. Levoatriocardinal Vein and Mimics: Spectrum of Imaging Findings.

Agarwal PP, Mahani MG, Lu JC, Dorfman AL.

AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2015 Aug;205(2):W162-71. doi: 10.2214/AJR.15.14365.

PMID: 26204303

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Select item 25864712

 

  1. Practical guidelines for managing adults with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

Fung WL, Butcher NJ, Costain G, Andrade DM, Boot E, Chow EW, Chung B, Cytrynbaum C, Faghfoury H, Fishman L, García-Miñaúr S, George S, Lang AE, Repetto G, Shugar A, Silversides C, Swillen A, van Amelsvoort T, McDonald-McGinn DM, Bassett AS.

Genet Med. 2015 Aug;17(8):599-609. doi: 10.1038/gim.2014.175. Epub 2015 Jan 8. Review.

PMID: 25569435 Free PMC Article

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Select item 25956966

 

  1. Impaired exercise capacity and left ventricular function in long-term adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

Christiansen JR, Kanellopoulos A, Lund MB, Massey R, Dalen H, Kiserud CE, Ruud E, Aakhus S.

Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2015 Aug;62(8):1437-43. doi: 10.1002/pbc.25492. Epub 2015 Apr 1.

PMID: 25832752

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  1. Clinical Profile and Quality of Life of Adult Patients After the Fontan Procedure.

Bordin G, Padalino MA, Perentaler S, Castaldi B, Maschietto N, Michieli P, Crepaz R, Frigo AC, Vida VL, Milanesi O.

Pediatr Cardiol. 2015 Aug;36(6):1261-9. doi: 10.1007/s00246-015-1156-y. Epub 2015 Apr 2.

PMID: 25828147

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  1. Right Ventricular Mass is Associated with Exercise Capacity in Adults with Repaired Tetralogy of Fallot.

O’Meagher S, Seneviratne M, Skilton MR, Munoz PA, Robinson PJ, Malitz N, Tanous DJ, Celermajer DS, Puranik R.

Pediatr Cardiol. 2015 Aug;36(6):1225-31. doi: 10.1007/s00246-015-1150-4. Epub 2015 Mar 21.

PMID: 25795311

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  1. Late-presenting aortopulmonary window: Illustration of an uncommon lesion.

Pratap H, Chatterjee S.

Ann Pediatr Cardiol. 2015 May-Aug;8(2):175-6. doi: 10.4103/0974-2069.154153. No abstract available.

PMID: 26085779 Free PMC Article

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